June Reads…

June Reads…

Hey everyone!

This month’s reading list is a little ambitious but I’m going to try and push it and get through all of these titles! Happy reading!

 

The Mothers: Brit Bennett

Set within a contemporary black community in Southern California, Brit Bennett’s mesmerizing first novel is an emotionally perceptive story about community, love, and ambition. It begins with a secret.

“All good secrets have a taste before you tell them, and if we’d taken a moment to swish this one around our mouths, we might have noticed the sourness of an unripe secret, plucked too soon, stolen and passed around before its season.”

It is the last season of high school life for Nadia Turner, a rebellious, grief-stricken, seventeen-year-old beauty. Mourning her own mother’s recent suicide, she takes up with the local pastor’s son. Luke Sheppard is twenty-one, a former football star whose injury has reduced him to waiting tables at a diner. They are young; it’s not serious. But the pregnancy that results from this teen romance—and the subsequent cover-up—will have an impact that goes far beyond their youth. As Nadia hides her secret from everyone, including Aubrey, her God-fearing best friend, the years move quickly. Soon, Nadia, Luke, and Aubrey are full-fledged adults and still living in debt to the choices they made that one seaside summer, caught in a love triangle they must carefully maneuver, and dogged by the constant, nagging question: What if they had chosen differently? The possibilities of the road not taken are a relentless haunt.

In entrancing, lyrical prose, The Mothers asks whether a “what if” can be more powerful than an experience itself. If, as time passes, we must always live in servitude to the decisions of our younger selves, to the communities that have parented us, and to the decisions we make that shape our lives forever

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I started to read these a while ago, got sidetracked and put. it to the side. I’m currently reading this one and it’s pretty good. 

*****

Opposite of Always: Justin A. Reynolds

Jack Ellison King. King of Almost.

He almost made valedictorian.

He almost made varsity.

He almost got the girl . . .

When Jack and Kate meet at a party, bonding until sunrise over their mutual love of Froot Loops and their favorite flicks, Jack knows he’s falling—hard. Soon she’s meeting his best friends, Jillian and Franny, and Kate wins them over as easily as she did Jack. Jack’s curse of almost is finally over.

But this love story is . . . complicated. It is an almost happily ever after. Because Kate dies. And their story should end there. Yet Kate’s death sends Jack back to the beginning, the moment they first meet, and Kate’s there again. Beautiful, radiant Kate. Healthy, happy, and charming as ever. Jack isn’t sure if he’s losing his mind. Still, if he has a chance to prevent Kate’s death, he’ll take it. Even if that means believing in time travel. However, Jack will learn that his actions are not without consequences. And when one choice turns deadly for someone else close to him, he has to figure out what he’s willing to do—and let go—to save the people he loves.

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I was browsing in the bookstore and the cover jumped out to me. After reading the synopsis, I was intrigued. Looking forward to getting to this title.

*****

Let Me Hear a Rhyme: Tiffany D. Jackson

In this standalone novel, Tiffany D. Jackson tells the story of three Brooklyn teens who plot to turn their murdered friend into a major rap star by pretending he is still alive.

Biggie Smalls was right. Things done changed. But that doesn’t mean that Quadir and Jarrell are okay letting their best friend Steph’s tracks lie forgotten in his bedroom after he’s killed—not when his beats could turn any Bed-Stuy corner into a celebration, not after years of having each other’s backs.

Enlisting the help of Steph’s younger sister, Jasmine, Quadir and Jarrell come up with a plan to promote Steph’s music under a new rap name: The Architect. Soon, everyone in Brooklyn is dancing to Steph’s voice. But then his mixtape catches the attention of a hotheaded music rep and—with just hours on the clock—the trio must race to prove Steph’s talent from beyond the grave.

Now, as the pressure—and danger—of keeping their secret grows, Quadir, Jarrell, and Jasmine are forced to confront the truth about what happened to Steph. Only each has something to hide. And with everything riding on Steph’s fame, together they need to decide what they stand for before they lose everything they’ve worked so hard to hold on to—including each other.

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I have loved each of this author’s previous works, so once I saw this on the shelf I had to purchase it. I’m hoping it is as quick and as pleasant to read as the others.
******

It’s Not Supposed to Be This Way: Lysa TerKeurst

New York Times  bestselling author Lysa TerKeurst unveils her heart amid shattering circumstances and shows readers how to live assured when life doesn’t turn out like they expected.

What do you do when God’s timing seems questionable, His lack of intervention hurtful, and His promises doubtful?

Life often looks so very different than we hoped or expected. Some events may simply catch us off guard for a moment, but others shatter us completely. We feel disappointed and disillusioned, and we quietly start to wonder about the reality of God’s goodness.

Lysa TerKeurst understands this deeply. But she’s also discovered that our disappointments can be the divine appointments our souls need to radically encounter God. In It’s Not Supposed to Be This Way, Lysa invites us into her own journey of faith and, with grit, vulnerability, and honest humor, helps us to:

* Stop being pulled into the anxiety of disappointment by discovering how to better process unmet expectations and other painful situations.
* Train ourselves to recognize the three strategies of the enemy so we can stand strong and persevere through unsettling relationships and uncertain outcomes.
* Discover the secret of being steadfast and not panicking when God actually does give us more than we can handle.
* Shift our suspicion that God is cruel or unfair to the biblical assurance that God is protecting and preparing us.
* Know how to encourage a friend and help her navigate hard realities with real help from God’s truth

[It's Not Supposed to Be This Way (Signed Book) by Lysa TerKeurst

I purchased this one on a whim. It spoke to me at the moment. As I like to have something faith-based in addition to the bible in my monthly rotation, I figured I’d give this one a try.

******

Defending Jacob: William Landay

Award-winning author William Landay has written the consummate novel of an embattled family in crisis – a suspenseful, character-driven mystery that is also a spellbinding tale of guilt, betrayal, and the terrifying speed at which our lives can spin out of control.

Andy Barber has been an assistant district attorney in his suburban Massachusetts county for more than twenty years. He is respected in his community, tenacious in the courtroom, and happy at home with his wife, Laurie, and son, Jacob. But when a shocking crime shatters their New England town, Andy is blindsided by what happens next: His fourteen-year-old son is charged with the murder of a fellow student.

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A co-worker of mine gathered a bunch of us at work who share a love for reading, a started a little book club. This month we start with this book, Sounds interesting. Not normally a genre I often gravitate too but I’m interested to read something with a group of people and engage in some meaningful conversation! 🙂

That’s it for this month! What are you guys reading this month? I need suggestions for July!

( all synopsis’ from goodreads.com I do not own any of them)

xoxo

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March Reads…

March Reads…

Hey loves!

Here’s a peek into what I’ll be reading for the month of March!

1.  Housegirl: Michael Donkor 

Moving between Ghana and London, Hold is an intimate, moving, powerful coming-of-age novel. It’s a story of friendship and family, shame and forgiveness; of learning what we should cling to, and when we need to let go.

Belinda knows how to follow the rules. As a housegirl, she has learnt the right way to polish water glasses, to wash and fold a hundred handkerchiefs, and to keep a tight lid on memories of the village she left behind when she came to Kumasi.

Mary is still learning the rules. Eleven-years-old and irrepressible, the young housegirl-in-training is the little sister Belinda never had.

Amma has had enough of the rules. A straight-A pupil at her exclusive South-London school, she has always been the pride of her Ghanaian parents. Until now. Watching their once-confident teenager grow sullen and wayward, they decide that sensible Belinda might be just the shining example Amma needs.

So Belinda is summoned from Ghana to London and must leave Mary to befriend a troubled girl who shows no desire for her friendship. She encounters a city as bewildering as it is thrilling, and tries to impose order on her unsettling new world.

As the Brixton summer turns to Autumn, Belinda and Amma are surprised to discover the beginnings of an unexpected kinship. But when the cracks in their defences open up, the secrets they have both been holding tightly threaten to seep out. (Goodreads.com)

Housegirl

I’m already quite a bit through this one and frankly, I’m regretting spending time reading this. I hope it gets better but so far… I’m not impressed.

2. On The Come Up: Angie Thomas 

Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least make it out of her neighbourhood one day. As the daughter of an underground rap legend who died before he hit big, Bri’s got big shoes to fill. But now that her mom has unexpectedly lost her job, food banks and shutoff notices are as much a part of Bri’s life as beats and rhymes. With bills piling up and homelessness staring her family down, Bri no longer just wants to make it—she has to make it.

On the Come Up is Angie Thomas’s homage to hip-hop, the art that sparked her passion for storytelling and continues to inspire her to this day. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; of the struggle to become who you are and not who everyone expects you to be; and of the desperate realities of poor and working-class black families (Goodreads.com) 

On the Come Up

I actually read this book as soon as I got my hands on it in mid-February, but it was originally on my March TBR. I just couldn’t wait and I was not disappointed, While this book has mixed reviews ( no less coming on the heels of the widely acclaimed “The Hate U Give” ) I absolutely loved it and I am anxiously awaiting whatever Angie Thomas has coming next!

3, Where The Crawdads Sing: Delia Owens 

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life–until the unthinkable happens.

Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps (Goodreads.com)

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I found the synopsis of this book super intriguing. It’s a much different genre than I’m used to reading but since it sparked my interest, I’ll give it a try!

4. Colliding With Destiny: Finding Hope in the Legacy of Ruth: Sarah Jakes

The story of Ruth is a journey of transformation. By allowing God to transform her circumstances, Ruth went from a widow who would be excluded from society to a wife with a secure and protected future, a future that ultimately paved the way for the birth of King David! Her story is full of collision–loss, heartache, poverty, even shame–but she never let her past define her. Instead, the most painful time of her life became her most pivotal, propelling her to a destiny she never imagined.

Perhaps you have a past you’re struggling to overcome. If disappointments, whether a result of your own choices or the actions of others, have kept you from being your true self, this book is for you. Follow Ruth’s life and discover the hope available to each of us. Your yesterday does not have to dictate your tomorrow.

Despite your past pain, you, too, can find redemption and restoration.

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This is a re-read for me. I oftentimes like to re-read books depending on the season of life I find myself in. The story of Ruth is always one I like to dive back into. I also love the way Sarah Jakes brings this story to life.

 

Lastly, I’ll be doing another devotional from the Daily Grace Co.  This month( and April ) I will be journeying through the book of Isaiah. 

Everlasting Love - Study on Isaiah

What are you reading this month?

xoxo
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What I Read in January…

What I Read in January…

Hey y’all!

January was a slow reading month. I ended up finishing up “Becoming” by Michelle Obama from my December reading list. It took me a bit longer  to read because January was a pretty busy month for me.  But wow, what a powerful read it was. I love the way the class of Mrs Obama just jumps off of the page. I’m not American, but she is truly missed as the FLOTUS.

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I also read Gary Chapmans book  “God Speaks Your Love Language: How to experience and express God’s Love “. This book is a very good resource for anybody who interested in learning about their “love language” in depth. It was a beautiful reminder that God truly speaks to each of us individual in a language that we understand.  This book helps us identify how our love language relates to our relationship with God. This book left lots of room for self reflection which I find very important. If you are interested in picking up this book, I would encourage you to read the original ” Five Love Languages ” book or take the quiz to find out what your love language is.

Quiz: https://www.5lovelanguages.com/profile/singles/

Here is a synopsis:

Feel God’s love more personally.

Do you realize that the God of the universe speaks your love language, and your expressions of love for Him are shaped by your love language? Learn how you can give and receive God’s love through the five love languages: words of affirmation, quality time, gifts, acts of service, and physical touch.

In this revised and updated edition of The Love Languages of God,Gary writes, “As we respond to the love of God and begin to identify the variety of languages He uses to speak to us, we soon learn to speak those languages ourselves. Whatever love language you prefer, may you find ever deeper satisfaction in using that language in your relationship with God and with other people.”

As you begin to identify the variety of languages God uses to speak love to you and others, you can learn to speak lovingly back to God and to those around you. No matter what love language you prefer, you will become more deeply connected with God and watch this bond transform all of your relationships.  ( Goodreads.com)

Other than that,  I spent a lot a time reading and studying the word of God as my church was in a 21 day fast, my time on social media was super limited. I spent a lot of time in the gospels this month! I’ve drawn a particular affinity to the book of Luke 🙂

Check back this week to see what I’m reading in February!

Til next time..
xoxo
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November Reads…

November Reads…

Hey guys!

I have a very ambitious reading list for the month of November. In addition to this terms textbook ( Creative Bible Teaching) I am going to try and read 4 books…… We’ll see how that goes! This is what I’m trying to get through this month:

  1. Sing, Unburied Sing: By Jesmyn Ward

    I absolutely love this author. I have read a few of her other books and have yet to be disappointed. This book has been on my to read list for quite some time so what a delight it was when I received a copy from my friend Jen as a gift! ( Thanks girl!) 

    Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. He doesn’t lack in fathers to study, chief among them his Black grandfather, Pop. But there are other men who complicate his understanding: his absent White father, Michael, who is being released from prison; his absent White grandfather, Big Joseph, who won’t acknowledge his existence; and the memories of his dead uncle, Given, who died as a teenager.

    His mother, Leonie, is an inconsistent presence in his and his toddler sister’s lives. She is an imperfect mother in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is Black and her children’s father is White. She wants to be a better mother but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use. Simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high, Leonie is embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances.

    When the children’s father is released from prison, Leonie packs her kids and a friend into her car and drives north to the heart of Mississippi and Parchman Farm, the State Penitentiary. At Parchman, there is another thirteen-year-old boy, the ghost of a dead inmate who carries all of the ugly history of the South with him in his wandering. He too has something to teach Jojo about fathers and sons, about legacies, about violence, about love

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  2. Far From The Tree: By Robin Benway

    I saw this book on somebody’s Youtube channel and it sounded pretty interesting. This is a young adult fiction book. 

    A contemporary novel about three adopted siblings who find each other at just the right moment.

    Being the middle child has its ups and downs.

    But for Grace, an only child who was adopted at birth, discovering that she is a middle child is a different ride altogether. After putting her own baby up for adoption, she goes looking for her biological family, including—

    Maya, her loudmouthed younger bio sister, who has a lot to say about their newfound family ties. Having grown up the snarky brunette in a house full of chipper redheads, she’s quick to search for traces of herself among these not-quite-strangers. And when her adopted family’s long-buried problems begin to explode to the surface, Maya can’t help but wonder where exactly it is that she belongs.

    And Joaquin, their stoic older bio brother, who has no interest in bonding over their shared biological mother. After seventeen years in the foster care system, he’s learned that there are no heroes, and secrets and fears are best kept close to the vest, where they can’t hurt anyone but him.
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  3. A Lesson Before Dying: By Ernest J. Gaines
    A classic book that I have never got around to reading. No time like the present right? 🙂

    A Lesson Before Dying is set in a small Cajun community in the late 1940s. Jefferson, a young black man, is an unwitting party to a liquor store shoot out in which three men are killed; the only survivor, he is convicted of murder and sentenced to death. Grant Wiggins, who left his hometown for the university, has returned to the plantation school to teach. As he struggles with his decision whether to stay or escape to another state, his aunt and Jefferson’s godmother persuade him to visit Jefferson in his cell and impart his learning and his pride to Jefferson before his death. In the end, the two men forge a bond as they both come to understand the simple heroism of resisting and defying the expected. Ernest J. Gaines brings to this novel the same rich sense of place, the same deep understanding of the human psyche, and the same compassion for a people and their struggle that have informed his previous, highly praised works of fiction
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  4. Dusty Crowns:  By Heather Lindsey
    I absolutely love Heather Lindsey and I am making my way through all of her written work!

    Have you ever felt like you are completely inadequate and regardless of what you do—you still don’t feel good enough? Well, Heather Lindsey felt the same way for years and she would try to earn God’s love and affirmation. After searching to fill her “God voids” in things, she learned what it meant to be the crown of her spiritual husband, God. Instead of chasing after unhealthy relationships, money and things, she sought a relationship with Jesus and He dusted her past off and made all things new. This book is a reminder that regardless of how far you have gotten away from God, He is still right there, ready to dust you off and make you whole.

    In this book, you will:

    • Learn what it means to be the crown of Jesus Christ and the crown of your physical husband, from the inside out.

    • Learn to protect your heart, mind and life from distractions.

    • Learn to enjoy the current season of your life and develop into the woman God called you to be.

    • Learn to refuse to settle for anything or anyone less than God’s best for your life.

    • See yourself how God sees you—valued, beautiful and special in His eyes.

    • Take advantage of the tests and trails and develop in patience

    Join Heather Lindsey on a heart-to-heart journey to becoming who God called you to be from the inside out. Dusty Crowns challenges women, whether single or married to be beautiful from the inside out and to accomplish the will of God for their life.
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    That’s it folks! Wish me luck! What are you guys reading this month?

    Till next time,
    xoxo

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July Reads…

July Reads…

Hey y’all

We are already halfway through July and I must admit I haven’t been doing that much new reading these past two weeks. I was playing catch up from my June reads. I finished all but one book last month and so one of my books is going to be a repeat. I will be travelling a lot this month and want to be able to soak up all the experiences that my travels have for me, so that means less reading more experiencing.:)  These are my picks for this month. I’ve narrowed it down to two books and a devotional :

The Pressure Trap: Heather Lindsey 

Do you feel stressed out and pressured about life? In this book, The Pressure Trap – Heather Lindsey exposes how to be free from the pressures of society so that you can fully do what God has called you to do. Don’t get caught in the trap of being pressured by this world. Instead, break free to do what God has called you to do! In this book, Heather tackles being pressured in the following areas: · Singlehood · Marriage · With your Children · Ministry · Your Job · Your career/purpose · Family
And so much more!

It is time to walk in freedom and it starts now!

This book is first up this month as I didn’t get to it in June. Really excited for it.
The Pressure Trap: Breaking Free from the Pressures of Society to Become Who God Called You to be

We Are Taking Only What We Need:  Stephanie Powell Watts

In these powerfully rendered, prizewinning stories, working-class African Americans across the South strive for meaning and search for direction in lives shaped by forces beyond their control

The ten stories in this resonant collection deal with both the ties that bind and the gulf that separates generations, from children confronting the fallibility of their own parents for the first time to adults finding themselves forced to start over again and again.

In “Highway 18” a young Jehovah’s Witness going door to door with an expert field-service partner from up north is at a crossroads: will she go to college or continue to serve the church? “If You Hit Randall County, You’ve Gone Too Far” tells of a family trying to make it through a tense celebratory dinner for a son just out on bail. And in the collection’s title story, a young girl experiences loss for the first time in the fallout from her father’s relationship with her babysitter.

Startling, intimate, and prescient on their own, these stories build to a kaleidoscopic understanding of both the individual and the collective black experience over the last fifty years in the American South. With We Are Taking Only What We Need,Stephanie Powell Watts has crafted an incredibly assured and emotionally affecting meditation on everything from the large institutional forces to the small interpersonal moments that impress upon us and direct our lives.

I’m not often a fan of anthologies or short story collections, but something about the cover intrigued me and I figured I’d give it a chance!

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Ruth Fields of Grace: A devotional from the Daily Grace Co. 

This 21 day study on the book of Ruth is an in-depth look at the book of Ruth and how this small book points to the gospel. The short book of Ruth is packed with grace and truth for every season of life. It is a reminder that God is present in the waiting and the ordinary. It is full of gospel-hope that God is working behind the scenes in ways that we could never imagine to sovereignly and providentially bring about His good plan for His people. This isn’t your ordinary study of Ruth. This isn’t just about a love story between Ruth and Boaz, but about the ultimate love story between God and His people.

Poverty to Provision
Brokenness to Beauty
Reproach to Redemption
Famine to Fullness
Grief to Grace
This is the gospel story seen in the book of Ruth.

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I absolutely love this company and its beautifully designed devotionals. This is my fourth study and plan on doing many many more!

That’s it for me this month! Happy Reading 🙂

( Click the links for the full book synopsis’ courtesy of Goodreads.com and harpercollins.com)

xoxo
©justlovethemanyway

June Reads…

June Reads…

Hey folks!

I have a very ambitious June reading list… here’s what I have on the agenda ! Wish me luck! (By the time you read this I have already finished one book and am halfway through my 2nd and 3rd!)

Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions :  Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.

Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today

Great book! I read this in one sitting as it is a very short book! I don’t agree with everything the author says, but there are quite a few good points that she taps into.  If you are interested in feminism as it pertains to African culture , pick this book up!

Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

Tyler Johnson Was Here: Jay Coles

When Marvin Johnson’s twin, Tyler, goes to a party, Marvin decides to tag along to keep an eye on his brother. But what starts as harmless fun turns into a shooting, followed by a police raid.

The next day, Tyler has gone missing, and it’s up to Marvin to find him. But when Tyler is found dead, a video leaked online tells an even more chilling story: Tyler has been shot and killed by a police officer. Terrified as his mother unravels and mourning a brother who is now a hashtag, Marvin must learn what justice and freedom really mean.

I’m currently reading this one. A little more profanity than I tend to prefer  and its laced with some tough content. However, so far so good! If you enjoyed “The Hate U Give” this book is right up your alley.
Tyler Johnson Was Here

Leaving Atlanta: Tayari Jones 

An award-winning author makes her fiction debut with this coming-of-age story of three young black children set against the backdrop of the Atlanta child murders of 1979

I just read “An American Marriage”  by this author and really loved it. I’m looking forward to diving into this one.

Leaving Atlanta


The Pressure Trap: Heather Lindsey 

Do you feel stressed out and pressured about life? In this book, The Pressure Trap – Heather Lindsey exposes how to be free from the pressures of society so that you can fully do what God has called you to do. Don’t get caught in the trap of being pressured by this world. Instead, break free to do what God has called you to do! In this book, Heather tackles being pressured in the following areas: · Singlehood · Marriage · With your Children · Ministry · Your Job · Your career/purpose · Family
And so much more! It is time to walk in freedom and it starts now!

I’ve read several books by Heather Lindsey and I just love all that she stands for and represents! I can’t wait to see how Heather brings God’s word to life through these pages. I just admire how down to earth and real she is through her writing. It’s cathartic to read!
The Pressure Trap: Breaking Free from the Pressures of Society to Become Who God Called You to be

Overlooked : Does Anyone See Me and What I’m Going Through?: Cornelius Lindsey

Overlooked: Does Anyone See Me and What I'm Going Through?Have you ever felt overlooked by God? Have you felt like you’re always the bridesmaid or the groomsman but never the bride or groom? Have you felt like you’re always the last to be considered—like you’re forgotten by your friends and family? Are you searching for answers to these questions and so many more? If so, this book is for you. Cornelius takes you on a journey of self-discovery and enlightenment. He challenges you to think differently about what it means to be overlooked. Writing about his own experiences and sharing stories from people he’s encountered while traveling the world, he explores the feelings everyday people have about significance, self-worth and finding their place in the world. Take this journey of self-discovery and answer the question: Does anyone see me and  what I’m going through?

I’m also currently reading this book and already I’m captivated! This is the first book I’m reading by Cornelius Lindsey ( husband to Heather Lindsey)  and I’m already looking into picking up a few more.:)

February/March Reads…

February/March Reads…

Hey loves!

The month of February has been kind of a bust when it cones to reading for me. Too much going on for me to actually spend some leisurely time reading this month, so im going to combine the books I had wanted to read this month and roll them right into my March reads! Hope you find something interesting on this list and let me know what you’re reading for next few months 🙂

(Disclaimer: All book synopsis’ are courtesy of Goodreads.com)

  1. Where The Line Bleeds: Jesmyn Ward. 

Image result for where the line bleeds by jesmyn wardSet in a rural town on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, Where the Line Bleeds tells the story of fraternal twins Joshua and Christophe, who are graduating high school as the novel begins. The two boys both anticipate and dread their lives as adults. Joshua finds a job working as a dock laborer on the Gulf of Mexico, but Christophe has less luck: Unable to find a job, and desperate to alleviate his family’s poverty, he starts to sell drugs. Joshua does not approve, but his clumsy concern fractures the twins’ relationship. When their long-missing addict father reappears, he provokes a shocking confrontation between himself and the brothers—one that will ultimately damn or save them.

Where the Line Bleeds is unforgettable for the intense clarity of how the main relationships are rendered: the love but growing tension between the twins; their devotion to the slowly failing grandmother to raised them, and the sense of obligation they feel toward her; and most of all, the alternating pain, bewilderment, anger, and yearning they feel for the parents who abandoned them—their mother for a new life in the big city of Atlanta, and their father for drugs, prison, and even harsher debasements. (Goodreads.com)

2.  The Wait: A Powerful Practice for Finding the Love of Your Life and the Life You Love : Devon Fanklin and Meagan Good The Wait: A Powerful Practice for Finding the Love of Your Life and the Life You Love

Hollywood power couple DeVon Franklin and Meagan Good candidly share about their courtship and marriage, and the key to their success—waiting.

President/CEO of Franklin Entertainment and former Sony Pictures executive DeVon Franklin and award-winning actress Meagan Good have learned sometimes all we can do is wait for “the one” to come into our lives. They spent years crossing paths but it wasn’t until they were thrown together while working on the film Jumping the Broom that their storybook romance began.

Faced with starting a new relationship and wanting to avoid potentially devastating relationship pitfalls, DeVon and Meagan chose to do something almost unheard of in today’s society—abstain from sex until they were married.

In The Wait, DeVon and Meagan share the life-changing message that waiting—rather than rushing a relationship—can help you find the person you’re meant to be with. Filled with candid his-and-hers accounts of the most important moments of their relationship, and practical advice on how waiting for everything—from dating to sex—can transform relationships, allowing you to find a deep connection based on patience, trust, and faith (Goodreads.com) 

3. The Mothers: Britt Bennett ( Shout out to my girl Chelsey Bogle for the suggestion<3) 

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Set within a contemporary black community in Southern California, Brit Bennett’s mesmerizing first novel is an emotionally perceptive story about community, love, and ambition. It begins with a secret.

“All good secrets have a taste before you tell them, and if we’d taken a moment to swish this one around our mouths, we might have noticed the sourness of an unripe secret, plucked too soon, stolen and passed around before its season.”

It is the last season of high school life for Nadia Turner, a rebellious, grief-stricken, seventeen-year-old beauty. Mourning her own mother’s recent suicide, she takes up with the local pastor’s son. Luke Sheppard is twenty-one, a former football star whose injury has reduced him to waiting tables at a diner. They are young; it’s not serious. But the pregnancy that results from this teen romance—and the subsequent cover-up—will have an impact that goes far beyond their youth. As Nadia hides her secret from everyone, including Aubrey, her God-fearing best friend, the years move quickly. Soon, Nadia, Luke, and Aubrey are full-fledged adults and still living in debt to the choices they made that one seaside summer, caught in a love triangle they must carefully maneuver, and dogged by the constant, nagging question: What if they had chosen differently? The possibilities of the road not taken are a relentless haunt.

In entrancing, lyrical prose, The Mothers asks whether a “what if” can be more powerful than an experience itself. If, as time passes, we must always live in servitude to the decisions of our younger selves, to the communities that have parented us, and to the decisions we make that shape our lives forever. (Goodreads.com)

4. This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in.  (White) America: Morgan Jerkins  This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America

From one of the fiercest critics writing today, Morgan Jerkins’ highly-anticipated collection of linked essays interweaves her incisive commentary on pop culture, feminism, black history, misogyny, and racism with her own experiences to confront the very real challenges of being a black woman today—perfect for fans of Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist, Rebecca Solnit’s Men Explain Things to Me, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s We Should All Be Feminists.

Morgan Jerkins is only in her twenties, but she has already established herself as an insightful, brutally honest writer who isn’t afraid of tackling tough, controversial subjects. In This Will Be My Undoing, she takes on perhaps one of the most provocative contemporary topics: What does it mean to “be”—to live as, to exist as—a black woman today? This is a book about black women, but it’s necessary reading for all Americans.

Doubly disenfranchised by race and gender, often deprived of a place within the mostly white mainstream feminist movement, black women are objectified, silenced, and marginalized with devastating consequences, in ways both obvious and subtle, that are rarely acknowledged in our country’s larger discussion about inequality. In This Will Be My Undoing, Jerkins becomes both narrator and subject to expose the social, cultural, and historical story of black female oppression that influences the black community as well as the white, male-dominated world at large ( Goodreads.com)

I think this is a pretty manageable list! Wish me luck and happy reading!
xoxo
©justlovethemanyway