Wednesday Weekly Reads: I Love The Book I’m Reading…. and I Have Tons Of Magazines To Read!

Wednesday Weekly Reads: I Love The Book I’m Reading…. and I Have Tons Of Magazines To Read!

Hey y’all,

Quick edition of Wednesday Weekly Reads this week. I am currently tandem reading two books. The first one being, “When The Moon Is Low” by Nadia Hashimi. She is the same author who wrote the book, “The Pearl Who Book It’s Shell” which I absolutely loved.  ( I read it earlier this year.) Here is its quick synopsis:

In Kabul, 2007, with a drug-addicted father and no brothers, Rahima and her sisters can only sporadically attend school, and can rarely leave the house. Their only hope lies in the ancient custom of bacha posh, which allows young Rahima to dress and be treated as a boy until she is of marriageable age. As a son, she can attend school, go to the market, and chaperone her older sisters.But Rahima is not the first in her family to adopt this unusual custom. A century earlier, her great-great grandmother, Shekiba, left orphaned by an epidemic, saved herself and built a new life the same way.Crisscrossing in time, The Pearl the Broke Its Shell interweaves the tales of these two women separated by a century who share similar destinies. But what will happen once Rahima is of marriageable age? Will Shekiba always live as a man? And if Rahima cannot adapt to life as a bride, how will she survive? (amazon.com)

I encourage everyone to read this book if they get a chance. It really delves into the plight that many Afghani women have to face. 

Her next book also depicts the plight of life in a war torn country.  Except this time, the story deals with the hardships that fall on a family, who has lost the patriarch and are trying to escape and make a life for themselves elsewhere. The synopsis of ” When The Moon is Low” is as follows:

Mahmoud’s passion for his wife Fereiba, a schoolteacher, is greater than any love she’s ever known. But their happy, middle-class world—a life of education, work, and comfort—implodes when their country is engulfed in war, and the Taliban rises to power.

Mahmoud, a civil engineer, becomes a target of the new fundamentalist regime and is murdered. Forced to flee Kabul with her three children, Fereiba has one hope to survive: she must find a way to cross Europe and reach her sister’s family in England. With forged papers and help from kind strangers they meet along the way, Fereiba make a dangerous crossing into Iran under cover of darkness. Exhausted and brokenhearted but undefeated, Fereiba manages to smuggle them as far as Greece. But in a busy market square, their fate takes a frightening turn when her teenage son, Saleem, becomes separated from the rest of the family.

Faced with an impossible choice, Fereiba pushes on with her daughter and baby, while Saleem falls into the shadowy underground network of undocumented Afghans who haunt the streets of Europe’s capitals. Across the continent Fereiba and Saleem struggle to reunite, and ultimately find a place where they can begin to reconstruct their lives.( harpercollins.com)

I’m just about finished with this book as its story is so captivating, I can’t put it down. I hope to finish this up by Friday.

Next, I started reading a book entitled, “The Crying Tree” by Naseem Rakha, It is also really good. I picked this book on a whim while perusing the shelves of my local library. The synopsis of this book is as follows:

Irene and Nate Stanley are living a quiet and contented life with their two children, Bliss and Shep, on their family farm in southern Illinois when Nate suddenly announces he’s been offered a job as a deputy sheriff in Oregon. Irene fights her husband. She doesn’t want to uproot her family and has deep misgivings about the move. Nevertheless, the family leaves, and they’re just settling into their life in Oregon’s high desert when the unthinkable happens. Fifteen-year-old Shep is shot and killed during an apparent robbery in their home. The murderer, a young mechanic with a history of assault, robbery, and drug-related offenses, is caught and sentenced to death.

Shep’s murder sends the Stanley family into a tailspin, with each member attempting to cope with the tragedy in his or her own way. Irene’s approach is to live, week after week, waiting for Daniel Robbin’s execution and the justice she feels she and her family deserve. Those weeks turn into months and then years. Ultimately, faced with a growing sense that Robbin’s death won’t stop her pain, Irene takes the extraordinary and clandestine step of reaching out to her son’s killer. The two forge an unlikely connection that remains a secret from her family and friends.

Then Irene receives the notice that she had craved for so long – Daniel Robbin has stopped his appeals and will be executed within a month. This announcement shakes the very core of the Stanley family. Irene, it turns out, isn’t the only one with a shocking secret. As the execution date nears, the Stanleys must face difficult truths and find a way to come to terms with the past.

I’m only about 50 pages into this book. It has the possibility to be a really good book, I hope it doesn’t disappoint me (lol). Hopefully I will finish this up this week.

Other than that, I have a TON of magazines to catch up on and i picked up the book “Red Queen” by Victoria Aveyard from the library. Everybody in the YouTube book world has been raving about it and I want to see what all the hype is about. I’m on day 15 of the Proverbs challenge! I hope this is a successful reading week for you!

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: I Didn’t Read Much…

Wednesday Weekly Reads: I Didn’t Read Much…

Hey guys!

Quick post today because I visited the eye doctor for an annual check up and she put drops in my eyes to dilate them and my vision is kinda wonky right now! So typing this is a challenge!

Anyway, to make a long story short, i barely did any reading this week and I probably wont do much for the rest of July (lol) Its vacation season and im jetting off on a plane in 2 days. I have yet to pack….. sigh.

I did manage to finish, “All The Bright Places” by Jennifer Niven. What a great book! I really think that the author was able to capture the face of depression and the mask that so many people  wear when trying to convince everyone that they are okay.You can never truly know what someone is going through, but this books serves as a reminder to us all to pay attention.To treat everyone with love and compassion and to cherish those you love each and everyday. One kind word could save a life…I give this book a 4 out of 5 stars.

                     4 out of 5 stars….

As for next week/travel, I have no set goals! I really wanted to re-read ” To Kill a Mockingbird” in anticipation of is sequels ( “Go Set a Watchman) release on July 14th. But the way things are going…who knows?

I am also doing the Proverbs challenge! I chapter of Proverbs a day for the month of July. As of right now its day 8! So far so good. I am also continuing with Ezekiel 🙂

Have a successful reading week!

What are you guys reading this summer?

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Busy Week.. And My Book Choice Bored Me…

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Busy Week.. And My Book Choice Bored Me…

First and foremost, Happy Canada Day to all my fellow Canadians living here or abroad 🙂 Oh Canada!!! 🙂

Alright, now back to book business! The book I chose to read this week “Watch the Sky” by Kirsten Hubbard was a total bust. I just couldn’t get past the first 30 pages. The story just didn’t draw me in at all ( Read my synopsis in last Wednesday’s book blog post)  So I had to put it down. Sorry! No offence to the author, but the writing style just really didn’t connect with me . 

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So I put that down and I picked up “All the Bright Places” by Jennifer Niven. The synopsis of this book is as followed: ( as found on Goodreads.com) :

Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him.

Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death.

When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it’s unclear who saves whom. And when they pair up on a project to discover the “natural wonders” of their state, both Finch and Violet make more important discoveries: It’s only with Violet that Finch can be himself—a weird, funny, live-out-loud guy who’s not such a freak after all. And it’s only with Finch that Violet can forget to count away the days and start living them. But as Violet’s world grows, Finch’s begins to shrink.

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I have been reading this book for a few days and its pretty good so far. It’s a book I have wanted to read for a while. I’m about 105 pages in so far. It is extremely well written and the content is extremely deep. Considering all the grief I have experienced the past few weeks, I’m not sure why I chose this book…. but hey it is what it is! I recently heard that this book is going to be a major motion picture in the near future.

I hope to finish this book this week. As for what’s up next… I really have no idea. It’s summer y’all! I’m up and down and all over the place so who knows if I’ll even have much time to read this week 🙂  I’ll let the chips fall where they may! Have a great reading week guys!!

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Quick Reads

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Quick Reads

Hey Guys!

I hope you had a successful reading week. I did! After completing Roots, I wanted some quick reads that were easier to get through. So I dived back into the world of Young Adult Fiction. 🙂 ( my guilty pleasure)

As I mentioned last week I began the book “Tease” by Amanda Maciel. I managed to finish that really quickly. The content was still pretty deep as the content dealt with bullying/cyber bullying, suicide and the repercussions of your actions. As someone who works with children, It served as a reminder that I need to ensure that the children I am nurturing, are children who are kind, compassionate and wise. If you know of someone being bullied, don’t just let it happen. Speak up and get help. If not, it could cost someone their life. I’d give this book four out of five stars. I’m not sure if I loved the ending of this book. It kind of just ended flatly. All in all, I’d recommend it especially for preteens/teens.

4/5 stars…

Next I picked up the book “Mosquitoland” by David Arnold. The synopsis of this book as found on davidarnoldbooks.com  reads:

After the sudden collapse of her family, Mim Malone is dragged from her home in northern Ohio to the “wastelands” of Mississippi, where she lives in a medicated milieu with her dad and new stepmom. Before the dust has a chance to settle, she learns her mother is sick back in Cleveland.

So she ditches her new life and hops aboard a northbound Greyhound bus to her real home and her real mother, meeting a quirky cast of fellow travelers along the way. But when her thousand-mile journey takes a few turns she could never see coming, Mim must confront her own demons, redefining her notions of love, loyalty, and what it means to be sane.

What a fantastic book! I read this book in a day and a half! This book touches on the serious topics of mental health issues. In this book it becomes evident that the protagonist Mim has some serious issues; mental health and emotional. After being forced to move from Ohio to Mississippi  with her father and stepmother ( leaving her mother behind) Mim is overcome with grief. She decides that she is going to run away and go back home to Ohio and see her mother. For the sake of not spoiling the entire story, Mim meets some interesting characters along the way and in turn discovers some things about herself and her family.  I did find that the last 50 pages or so dragged a bit. I still would encourage people of all ages to read this book. For a debut novel, I am impressed. I look forward to reading more of David Arnold’s work! He has a book in the works right now with a tentative fall 2016 release date. 🙂

4.5 out of 5 stars…

Lastly, I picked up “Watch the Sky” by Kirsten Hubbard. The synopsis of this book is as follows:

The signs are everywhere, Jory’s stepfather, Caleb, says. Red leaves in the springtime. Pages torn from a library book. All the fish in the aquarium facing the same way. A cracked egg with twin yolks. Everywhere and anywhere. And because of them Jory’s life is far from ordinary. He must follow a very specific set of rules: don’t trust anyone outside the family, have your works at the ready just in case, and always, always watch out for the signs. The end is coming, and they must be prepared.

School is Jory’s only escape from Caleb’s tight grasp, and with the help of new friends Jory begins to explore a world beyond his family’s farm. As Jory’s friendships grow, Caleb notifies Jory’s mother and siblings that the time has come for final preparations.

They begin an exhausting schedule digging a mysterious tunnel in anticipation of the disaster. But as the hold gets deeper, so does the family’s doubt about whether Caleb’s prophecy is true. When the stark reality of his stepfather’s plans becomes clear, Jory must choose between living his own life or following Caleb, shutting his eyes to the bright world he’s just begun to see ( goodreads.com)

I have only read about 20 pages of this book so far. So far it’s not really drawing me in. I’m going to really try to finish it! But if I get bored, I will probably pick up one of the other library Young Adult Fiction I have kicking around my house!

I also feel led to deviate from my weekly devotional and spend time in the book of Ezekiel. So I think that’s what I’m going to do this week!! ( Ezekiel 37 is probably my favorite passage of scripture)

Have a wonderful reading week!

What are you reading right now?

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: I finished Roots!

Wednesday Weekly Reads: I finished Roots!

Quick post today. I managed to finish Roots! I found it to be a great read. It took me a lot less time to read than I had anticipated it to! I did really look at the book as a work of “faction” ( facts that are embellished by fiction) I found it hard to actually believe that these incidents took place the way that they did simply because Mr Haley was accused of plagiarism. I think that if this story had been marketed as a work of fiction with some actual facts, the literary world, wouldn’t have been in such an uproar! However, this book has sold millions of copies and was even turned into a miniseries staring Levar Burton in 1977. Tough content, but  very much needed. You can’t know where you’re going if you don’t know where you’ve come from!

This week I started ( and have nearly completed) “Tease” by Amanda Maciel.  The synopsis of this book is as follows ( as found on amazon.com)

Emma Putnam is dead, and it’s all Sara Wharton’s fault.

At least, that’s what everyone seems to think. Sara, along with her best friend and three other classmates, has been criminally charged for the bullying and harassment that led to Emma’s shocking suicide. Now Sara is the one who’s ostracized, already guilty according to her peers, the community, and the media.

During the summer before her senior year, in between meetings with lawyers and a court-recommended therapist, Sara is forced to reflect on the events that brought her to this moment-and ultimately consider her role in an undeniable tragedy. And she’ll have to find a way to move forward, even when it feels like her own life is over.

So far a really good read! Really relevant content,especially in this social media/cyber bullying age that we live in. Well written! Awesome debut novel by Maciel.

Up next week:
Kinda leaving it up in the air. I have a bunch of library books to get through like:
– Mosquitoland by David Arnold
-All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

-Watch the Sky by Kirsten Hubbard
-The Walls Around Us by Suma Nova Ren
– My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga

I’ll pick one of those up!
Happy Reading!

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Continuing Roots…. and adding a new read

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Continuing Roots…. and adding a new read

Hey ya’ll!

So continued on with my reading of the classic novel “Roots”. Sadly, being the busy week that it was, I didn’t make much headway. I did manage to read 50 pages or so, bringing me to page 553 of 888.  I have reached the point where Kizzy, ( Kunta Kinte’s daughter ) has grown up and fallen in love with Noah ( another slave boy) Kizzy being able to read and write, helps Noah run away by forging a travelling pass for him. He in turn is caught and rats on Kizzy. Her master, despite the pleas of her parents Bell and Kunta, sells her, inevitably splitting up the only family Kunta has had since coming to America. That’s the part of the story I am at right now. It was pretty hard to read this section and I know the rest of the book will be equally as challenging on my heart.

I deviated from my plan to read only Roots until I finished it because I saw a BookTube vlog on a book that sounded so compelling, that I just had to get my hands on it! The book is called, “Tease” by Amanda Maciel.

The synopsis of this book is as follows:( as found on goodreads.com)

From debut author Amanda Maciel comes a provocative and unforgettable novel, inspired by real-life incidents, about a teenage girl who faces criminal charges for bullying after a classmate commits suicide.

Emma Putnam is dead, and it’s all Sara Wharton’s fault. At least, that’s what everyone seems to think. Sara, along with her best friend and three other classmates, has been criminally charged for the bullying and harassment that led to Emma’s shocking suicide. Now Sara is the one who’s ostracized, already guilty according to her peers, the community, and the media. In the summer before her senior year, in between meetings with lawyers and a court-recommended therapist, Sara is forced to reflect on the events that brought her to this moment—and ultimately consider her own role in an undeniable tragedy. And she’ll have to find a way to move forward, even when it feels like her own life is over.

With its powerful narrative, unconventional point of view, and strong anti-bullying theme, this coming-of-age story offers smart, insightful, and nuanced views on high school society, toxic friendships, and family relationships.

This is a story that is very relatable. As an educator, I see the effects of bullying almost on a daily basis. I do believe this will be an interesting read based on the fact that it shows the criminal aspect and also from the perspective of the bully. does she feel remorse? Is she even the main bully? I’ll have to read and find out. I’m already 40 pages in ( i started today) and I can already see that this bully might not be the only factor in this shocking story.

That’s it for this week! Hopefully I can finish up tease and at least 100 more pages of Roots! Wish me luck!

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Read: Feeling Motivated Again Finally!

Wednesday Weekly Read: Feeling Motivated Again Finally!

Guys,

After a two-week reading slump, I can honestly say I’M BACK! I’ve reignited my passion for reading again.( it was a sad two weeks without my books LOL)

Like I had mentioned before,I recently started reading the book “Roots” by Alex Haley and although I didn’t have an enormous amount of time to read, I did manage to get about 160 pages (of 888) into it! (Yay me!) Man, is it ever a captivating read! I The story has been journeying through the protagonist  Kunta Kinte’s childhood. Right now, I have reached the part of the story where Kunta has begun his manhood training. I don’t really want to say too much more, because if anybody has yet to read it, I don’t want to spoil the journey! I will continue with my progress next week. 🙂

I really have no set plans to read anything else right now, except for my “Women of the Bible” devotional. We just finished up “Tamar” and now we are on to “Potiphars Wife”. 

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Up next… Potiphars Wife…

I hope you all have a successful reading week!

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Reading Fail… And I’m Ok With That….

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Reading Fail… And I’m Ok With That….

Hi Guys!

Yup…. Once again I barely read  anything this week, but you know what… I’m totally okay with that! My teaching partner was away this past week, so that left all of the teaching responsibilities on me which left very little time ( or energy) for leisure reading. Plus, my most recent reading choices aren’t really sparking my interest right now. Those books I think are going to have to take a back seat and be picked up at a later date.

This week I picked up and started a very ambitious read. This is a book that I read as a young teenager but never really took the time to read it in-depth and take in the deep message that it carries. That book is “Roots” by Alex Haley.  Here is a brief synopsis: ( as described on enotes.com ( **spoiler alert**)

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In the spring of 1750 in Juffure, The Gambia, a son is born to Omoro Kinte and his second wife, Binta. The child is named Kunta. As a member of the old and highly esteemed Kinte family, Kunta is schooled in the customs and traditions befitting a future Mandinka warrior. Throughout his childhood, Kunta is taught to avoid and fear the “toubob,” white men who capture African people for evil purposes.

Despite these tribal caveats, Kunta is captured by white slave traders in 1767 while searching for a tree section to make a drum. Along with 140 Africans of various tribes, Kunta is shipped as cargo on the Lord Ligonier. Pestilence, filth, depravity, and cruelty fill this episode, serving as a controlling metaphor for the inhumanity of the institution of slavery. The captives unsuccessfully stage a revolt, resulting in the deaths of many. Kunta admires the courage of these dead, for they died as warriors. He, as a survivor, dreads what is to come, for he instinctively knows that his eventual fate will be worse than the ocean voyage.

In Annapolis, Maryland, Kunta is sold to John Waller and given the name “Toby.” Appalled by the toubob and their pagan ways, Kunta attempts to escape four times. After his last attempt, he is apprehended by two slave catchers. Given the choice of castration or foot amputation, Kunta chooses the latter. John Waller’s brother William, a physician, is outraged at the mutilation and buys Kunta.

Kunta, through the ministrations of William Waller’s cook, Bell, recovers from this last ordeal. After a lengthy courtship, he “jumps de broom” (the slave equivalent of the marriage ceremony) with Bell. A daughter is born to the couple. Kunta gives her the Mandinka name of “Kizzy,” meaning “you stay put.” Now crippled and unable to run away, Kunta is entrusted with driving Dr. Waller on his calls, which enables him to hear news of the outside world. Of particular interest to Kunta are the accounts of Toussaint Louverture’s revolt in Haiti, which he sees as paralleling his own struggle for freedom, especially when Napoleon Bonaparte captures Toussaint.

Kunta persists in keeping alive his dream of freedom and his pride in his African heritage, both of which he passes on to Kizzy. A clever child, Kizzy is entranced by her father’s African tales and learns many Mandinka words. At the age of sixteen, she is sold to the dissolute Tom Lea as punishment for aiding another slave to escape.

Lea rapes Kizzy repeatedly for several months, eventually fathering a son, George. Kizzy, a devoted mother, regards her son as the descendant of “the African,” not as the son of Tom Lea. She instills in her son both her pride in their African heritage and Kunta Kinte’s dream of freedom.

As George grows to manhood, he exhibits traits of both parents. Like Tom Lea, he loves cockfighting and carousing. The rakish George becomes such an accomplished trainer of gamecocks that he earns the sobriquet of “Chicken George.” From Kizzy he has inherited the desire to be free, and he is determined to buy himself and his family. When Lea loses Chicken George in a bet with an Englishman, he promises Chicken George his manumission papers upon his return.

Years later, Chicken George returns and is grudgingly freed by Lea. Kizzy has died during his absence, but Chicken George seeks to reunite his family, whom Lea had sold to the Murrays. When he finds the family, Chicken George gathers them around and relates the family narrative.

After the Civil War, the family moves to Henning, Tennessee. Upon Chicken George’s death, Tom Murray, his son, asserts his position as patriarch and emphasizes the importance of the family and the oral tradition to his children. Both of these ideas are perpetuated by Tom’s daughter, Cynthia, and other female members of the Murray family. Cynthia’s daughter Bertha, who evinces little interest in the family narrative, goes away to college, where she meets and marries Simon Alexander Haley.

While Haley is a graduate student at Cornell, their first son is born, Alexander Haley. At this point, the novel abruptly shifts to Haley’s first-person narrative, which recounts the death of his mother and the summers he and his brothers spent at Grandma Cynthia’s house listening to the “graying ladies” tell the story of “the African Kin-tay” who called a guitar a “ko” and the river “Kamby Bolongo.” In the final two chapters, Haley details the research and writing of Roots, addressing the fact/fiction elements of the novel.

There is a lot of controversy surrounding this book and Alex Haley’s account of history. Although he says this book is “fiction” he states that it is based on true facts. He actually refers to it as “faction” (aka fact fiction) There have also been claims and settlements that have occurred based on accusations of plagiarism. ( It has been claimed that some parts of the story come from the 1967 book “The African” by Harold Courlander.) Haley claims it was unintentional.

However, I started it this morning on my break and I’m 40 pages ( of 888) in. So this will be what I’ll be reading  for the next few weeks at least. I really want to dedicate most of my time to this novel for the  next little while. This book is also on my 2015 TBR list so I’d really like to knock it out.

I’ll also be continuing with my “Women of the Bible” devotional. We finished up Leah and now we are working on Tamar. She is an intense women! Lord!

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Working on Tamar…

Is anybody else in a slump? What are you reading this week?

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: April 29th 2015h

Wednesday Weekly Reads: April 29th 2015h

Hey Y’all

I’m tired guys lol. Its been a busy one! So let me do a quick wrap up!

This week I finished up  “I Love, I Hate, I Miss my Sister” by Amelie Sarn. I literally read this book in 90 minutes (It was just 150 pages). It didn’t love the writing of this book. I found the plot to be very monotonous ( Muslim girl ridiculed for her religious beliefs and choice of religious covering vs Muslim girl seen as not being “modest” enough.) It was just “meh”. I wouldn’t necessarily suggest this book to anyone to read.

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It was just “ok”

I finished up my study on “Lot’s Wife” from my group devotional! Interesting read!  It puts a true spin on the saying, “curiosity killed the  cat”  I really enjoyed the prayer at the end of this study. It reads:

Lord, You call me to live in a world without embracing the ways of the world. Help me to live in a way that preserves my freedom to follow you wherever and however you lead. If i should leave behind a monument, may it be a reminder to others of faith and not foolishness! ( excerpt from the “Women of the Bible devotional)

I tried to read “Coaltown Jesus” by Ron Koertge and I just couldn’t get in to the story because it was written entirely in prose. ( kind of like an Ellen Hopkins novel) Just not my cup of tea.

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Lastly, I started Hold Still” by Nina LaCour” and honestly I’m only a few pages in so I don’t have much to reportI’m going to try and finish this one up and give an honest report next week!

Next week I’m just going read whatever I want. I’m not going to set any goals. I’m  just going to go with the flow and read whatever comes my way. I’ve got a ton of pretty interesting library books to tackle!

Happy reading!

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Unmotivated….

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Unmotivated….

Hi guys,

So, this week I have just been so unmotivated in the reading department. Perhaps it was because the book I was reading had so many DRY points. As I previously mentioned in my previous Weekly Reads blog, I was reading “The Garden of Burning Sand” by Corban Addison. This book started out on such a high note for me. But as the pages lingered on, I began to lose interest in the story and really never became attached to the characters like I do in a really good book. This book however, did have some really intense parts that really drew me in but I found that this author just couldn’t keep my attention past a chapter or two at a time. It wasn’t a horrible book, just not a book I particularly enjoyed. Maybe I don’t really like the mystery/crime novel genre anymore… ah well! 😛

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3 out of 5 stars….Just not the book for me…

The only other thing I read this week was my devotional . The girls and I finished up studying Hagar and man what a story she had! This story serves to remind me that you can survive in the direst of situations just like Hagar had to when she was cast out into the wilderness with her young son. God is always with you and will always take care of you. This week we will be studying the story of Lot’s Wife.

So I didn’t do much reading last week. But I hope to change that this week! 🙂

I did a mini library haul. In my attempt to curb my book buying habits ( and the fact a made an oath to stop buying books until I read the ones I have lol) I picked up two books I wanted to read but not necessarily wanted to own. Firstly, I picked up “I Love, I Hate, I Miss my Sister” by Amelie Sarn. The synopsis of this book ( as described on Goodreads) reads:

18811323Two sisters. Two lives. One future.
Sohane loves no one more than her beautiful, carefree younger sister, Djelila. And she hates no one as much. They used to share everything. But now, Djelila is spending more time with her friends, partying, and hanging out with boys, while Sohane is becoming more religious.
When Sohane starts wearing a head scarf, her school threatens to expel her. Meanwhile, Djelila is harassed by neighborhood bullies for not being Muslim enough. Sohane can’t help thinking that Djelila deserves what she gets. But she never could have imagined just how far things would go. . . .

Next I picked up ” Coaltown Jesus” by Ron Koertge. This book is written entirely in prose which I normally am not a fan of. But the plot line was so intriguing.

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Walker shouldn’t have been so surprised to find Jesus standing in the middle of his bedroom. After all, he’d prayed for whoever was up there to help him, and to help his mom, who hadn’t stopped crying since Noah died two months ago. But since when have prayers actually been answered? And since when has Jesus been so . . . irreverent? But as astounding as Jesus’ sudden appearance is, it’s going to take more than divine intervention for Walker to come to terms with his brother’s sudden death. Why would God take seventeen-year-old Noah when half of the residents in his mom’s nursing home were waiting to die? And why would he send Jesus to Coaltown, Illinois, to pick up the pieces? In a spare and often humorous text, renowned poet Ron Koertge tackles some of life’s biggest questions — and humanizes the divine savior in a way that highlights the divinity in all of us ( Goodreads.com)

I picked up ” Hold Still” by Nina LaCour”  I honestly just picked it up because I liked the cover ( don’t judge me lol, all you book-worms are guilty of doing this at some point 😛

Devastating, hopeful, hopeless, playful . . . in words and illustrations, Ingrid left behind a painful farewell in her journal for Caitlin. Now Caitlin is left alone, by loss and by choice, struggling to find renewed hope in the wake of her best friend’s suicide. With the help of family and newfound friends, Caitlin will encounter first love, broaden her horizons, and start to realize that true friendship didn’t die with Ingrid. And the journal which once seemed only to chronicle Ingrid’s descent into depression, becomes the tool by which Caitlin once again reaches out to all those who loved Ingrid—and Caitlin herself.

I don’t know which ( if any ) of these gems I’ll pick up this week. I just wanted something light to read and these books are all pretty short! Have an awesome reading week! What are you reading this week?

xoxo