May Reads…

May Reads…

Hey y’ all

I’m not going to lie to you… March and April were not the best months of reading for me. I was in kind of a slump and was not motivated by anything I had prepared to read. Thus, you will see some repeats on here for the month of May ( lol)

What I actually  did end up reading the last two months:

Colliding with Destiny: Sarah Jakes ( now Sarah Jakes Roberts )
The Replacement Wife: Tiffany L  Warren
On The Come Up: Angie Thomas
Brutally Honest: By Melanie Brown ( From the Spice Girls)
Take the lid off- A  7-day reading plan and also the  Ready or Knot reading plan on the Bible App.

Here’s what I’m reading this month:

Where The Crawdads Sing: Delia Owens 

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life–until the unthinkable happens.

Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps (Goodreads.com)

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I just couldn’t get motivated to actually pick this one up last month! It’s next in line so fingers crossed I get to it this month!

Housegirl: Michael Donkor 

Moving between Ghana and London, Hold is an intimate, moving, powerful coming-of-age novel. It’s a story of friendship and family, shame and forgiveness; of learning what we should cling to, and when we need to let go.

Belinda knows how to follow the rules. As a housegirl, she has learnt the right way to polish water glasses, to wash and fold a hundred handkerchiefs, and to keep a tight lid on memories of the village she left behind when she came to Kumasi.

Mary is still learning the rules. Eleven-years-old and irrepressible, the young housegirl-in-training is the little sister Belinda never had.

Amma has had enough of the rules. A straight-A pupil at her exclusive South-London school, she has always been the pride of her Ghanaian parents. Until now. Watching their once-confident teenager grow sullen and wayward, they decide that sensible Belinda might be just the shining example Amma needs.

So Belinda is summoned from Ghana to London and must leave Mary to befriend a troubled girl who shows no desire for her friendship. She encounters a city as bewildering as it is thrilling, and tries to impose order on her unsettling new world.

As the Brixton summer turns to Autumn, Belinda and Amma are surprised to discover the beginnings of an unexpected kinship. But when the cracks in their defences open up, the secrets they have both been holding tightly threaten to seep out. (Goodreads.com)

Housegirl

I started this one back in March. I put it down for a while as I just couldn’t get into it. I really want to give this one another go.

 The Proposal: Jasmine Guillory

When someone asks you to spend your life with him, it shouldn’t come as a surprise–or happen in front of 45,000 people.

When freelance writer Nikole Paterson goes to a Dodgers game with her actor boyfriend, his man bun, and his bros, the last thing she expects is a scoreboard proposal. Saying no isn’t the hard part–they’ve only been dating for five months, and he can’t even spell her name correctly. The hard part is having to face a stadium full of disappointed fans…

At the game with his sister, Carlos Ibarra comes to Nik’s rescue and rushes her away from a camera crew. He’s even there for her when the video goes viral and Nik’s social media blows up–in a bad way. Nik knows that in the wilds of LA, a handsome doctor like Carlos can’t be looking for anything serious, so she embarks on an epic rebound with him, filled with food, fun, and fantastic sex. But when their glorified hookups start breaking the rules, one of them has to be smart enough to put on the brakes… (goodreads.com)

Okay, guys… I breezed through this one! I absolutely loved it! I purchased it on a whim and was pleasantly surprised. I wasn’t aware that it was part of a series, so I am going to go back and read the first one and am eagerly anticipating the next book in the series due out summer 2019

In The Midst Of It All: Tiffany L. Warren 

For feisty seventeen-year-old Zenovia, keeping strong in her faith is an uphill battle. Between her schizophrenic mother and their tough neighbourhood, her life has never been even remotely near normal. When the Brethren of the Sacrifice Church offers them acceptance and a chance at stability, even skeptical Zee can’t resist. Especially when Tristan, a handsome, fervent young member, acts like he wants her to be his one-and-only…and his wry older brother Justin reveals he’s more interested in Zee than he pretends. But when she falls hard for Emil, the Brethren’s outspoken rebel, her belief in mercy and tolerance puts her at odds with the Brethren, her new life—and her mother. Now Zee must come to terms with betrayal, deceit, and false faith. As she fights to grow spiritually and live on her own terms, she will discover how love, forgiveness, and God’s guidance can bring the most unexpected blessings. (goodreads.com)

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Queenie: Candice Carty-Williams

Bridget Jones’s Diary meets Americanah in this disarmingly honest, boldly political, and truly inclusive novel that will speak to anyone who has gone looking for love and found something very different in its place.

Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she’s constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle-class peers. After a messy break up from her long-term white boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places…including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth.

As Queenie careens from one questionable decision to another, she finds herself wondering, “What are you doing? Why are you doing it? Who do you want to be?”—all of the questions today’s woman must face in a world trying to answer them for her.

With “fresh and honest” (Jojo Moyes) prose, Queenie is a remarkably relatable exploration of what it means to be a modern woman searching for meaning in today’s world. (goodreads.com)

Queenie

I don’t generally pick a book at random, but I picked this book up solely because of its boldly hued cover and artwork depiction of a girl of colour with box braids.
I am currently 85% finished this novel already, and I literally started it 2 days ago! While it has some colourful language and some graphic adult content, I am thoroughly enjoying this author’s candid and relatable way of telling a story that touches on so many issues many people face today.  For a debut novel, I am highly anticipating her future works!

Lastly, currently I am focusing on this devotional from the Bible app:

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I think I am already off to a good start this month! What are you reading?

xoxo

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©justlovethemanyway

August Reads…

August Reads…

Hey y’all I have a bunch of new books to read for the month of August. My choices are kind of all over the place this month. I guess that’s what happens when you enter a book. store to pick up something for somebody else and get lost in the sales! Anyway, here’s what I chose:

The Darkest Minds : By Alexandra Bracken

When Ruby woke up on her tenth birthday, something about her had changed. Something frightening enough to make her parents lock her in the garage and call the police. Something that got her sent to Thurmond, a brutal government “rehabilitation camp.” She might have survived the mysterious disease that had killed most of America’s children, but she and the others emerged with something far worse: frightening abilities they could not control. Now sixteen, Ruby is one of the dangerous ones. When the truth comes out, Ruby barely escapes Thurmond with her life. She is on the run, desperate to find the only safe haven left for kids like her—East River. She joins a group of kids who have escaped their own camp. Liam, their brave leader, is falling hard for Ruby. But no matter how much she aches for him, Ruby can’t risk getting close. Not after what happened to her parents. When they arrive at East River, nothing is as it seems, least of all its mysterious leader. But there are other forces at work, people who will stop at nothing to use Ruby in their fight against the government. Ruby will be faced with a terrible choice, one that may mean giving up her only chance at having a life worth living.

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To be honest I hadn’t heard anything about this book ( which is actually Book one in a series) until I saw the trailer for the movie that comes out this month. It reminded me of a Hunger Games/ Divergent dystopian YA fiction that I absolutely love. The trailer totally captivated me and I always have to read the book before I watch the movie, so I picked this one up…. all 488 pages worth (LOL) I’m 2 chapters in and already sold so it shouldn’t be too hard to breeze through . Wish me luck!

Crazy Rich Asians:  Kevin Kwan

Crazy Rich Asians is the outrageously funny debut novel about three super-rich, pedigreed Chinese families and the gossip, backbiting, and scheming that occurs when the heir to one of the most massive fortunes in Asia brings home his ABC (American-born Chinese) girlfriend to the wedding of the season.
When Rachel Chu agrees to spend the summer in Singapore with her boyfriend, Nicholas Young, she envisions a humble family home, long drives to explore the island, and quality time with the man she might one day marry. What she doesn’t know is that Nick’s family home happens to look like a palace, that she’ll ride in more private planes than cars, and that with one of Asia’s most eligible bachelors on her arm, Rachel might as well have a target on her back. Initiated into a world of dynastic splendor beyond imagination, Rachel meets Astrid, the It Girl of Singapore society; Eddie, whose family practically lives in the pages of the Hong Kong socialite magazines; and Eleanor, Nick’s formidable mother, a woman who has very strong feelings about who her son should–and should not–marry. Uproarious, addictive, and filled with jaw-dropping opulence, Crazy Rich Asians is an insider’s look at the Asian JetSet; a perfect depiction of the clash between old money and new money; between Overseas Chinese and Mainland Chinese; and a fabulous novel about what it means to be young, in love, and gloriously, crazilyrich.

Image result for crazy rich asiansI have honestly been avoiding reading these books for years. I used read books by. this author K’wan and every single time I would look up his books, Kevin K’wan would pop up. So, because that irritated me, I ignored every suggestion to read this book. Then, I saw the movie trailer for this book, ( I sense a trend here) and was totally intrigued. Like I mentioned previously, I like to read the book before I see the movie so I’m hoping to breeze through this one quickly as this movie comes out this month as well.

Black Privilege : Charlamagne The God

An instant New York Times bestseller! Charlamagne Tha God—the self-proclaimed “Prince of Pissing People Off,” cohost of Power 105.1’s The Breakfast Club, and “the most important voice in hip-hop”—shares his eight principles for unlocking your God-given privilege.

In Black Privilege, Charlamagne presents his often controversial and always brutally honest insights on how living an authentic life is the quickest path to success. This journey to truth begins in the small town of Moncks Corner, South Carolina, and leads to New York and headline-grabbing interviews and insights from celebrities like Kanye West, Kevin Hart, Malcolm Gladwell, Lena Dunham, Jay Z, and Hillary Clinton.

Black Privilege lays out all the great wisdom Charlamagne’s been given from many mentors, and tells the uncensored story of how he turned around his troubled early life by owning his (many) mistakes and refusing to give up on his dreams, even after his controversial opinions got him fired from several on-air jobs. These life-learned principles include:

-There are no losses in life, only lessons
-Give people the credit they deserve for being stupid—starting with yourself
-It’s not the size of the pond but the hustle in the fish
-When you live your truth, no one can use it against you
-We all have privilege, we just need to access it

By combining his own story with bold advice and his signature commitment to honesty no matter the cost, Charlamagne hopes Black Privilege will empower you to live your own truth

Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It

Charlamagne is the brash, unapologetic , crude co anchor of the Breakfast Club on Power 105.1 FM New York. He may be very rough around the edges and crass with his verbiage, but he has a lot of things to say that make sense and provide us the reader with some tough food for thought. I’m entertained by his radio banter and intrigued by his views on black culture and society of today.

(Click the links in the book titles for the full Goodreads link)

I’m also going to be continuing my study on the book of Ruth in the Bible. 🙂

That’s all for this month folks!
Happy Reading!
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June Reads…

June Reads…

Hey folks!

I have a very ambitious June reading list… here’s what I have on the agenda ! Wish me luck! (By the time you read this I have already finished one book and am halfway through my 2nd and 3rd!)

Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions :  Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.

Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today

Great book! I read this in one sitting as it is a very short book! I don’t agree with everything the author says, but there are quite a few good points that she taps into.  If you are interested in feminism as it pertains to African culture , pick this book up!

Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

Tyler Johnson Was Here: Jay Coles

When Marvin Johnson’s twin, Tyler, goes to a party, Marvin decides to tag along to keep an eye on his brother. But what starts as harmless fun turns into a shooting, followed by a police raid.

The next day, Tyler has gone missing, and it’s up to Marvin to find him. But when Tyler is found dead, a video leaked online tells an even more chilling story: Tyler has been shot and killed by a police officer. Terrified as his mother unravels and mourning a brother who is now a hashtag, Marvin must learn what justice and freedom really mean.

I’m currently reading this one. A little more profanity than I tend to prefer  and its laced with some tough content. However, so far so good! If you enjoyed “The Hate U Give” this book is right up your alley.
Tyler Johnson Was Here

Leaving Atlanta: Tayari Jones 

An award-winning author makes her fiction debut with this coming-of-age story of three young black children set against the backdrop of the Atlanta child murders of 1979

I just read “An American Marriage”  by this author and really loved it. I’m looking forward to diving into this one.

Leaving Atlanta


The Pressure Trap: Heather Lindsey 

Do you feel stressed out and pressured about life? In this book, The Pressure Trap – Heather Lindsey exposes how to be free from the pressures of society so that you can fully do what God has called you to do. Don’t get caught in the trap of being pressured by this world. Instead, break free to do what God has called you to do! In this book, Heather tackles being pressured in the following areas: · Singlehood · Marriage · With your Children · Ministry · Your Job · Your career/purpose · Family
And so much more! It is time to walk in freedom and it starts now!

I’ve read several books by Heather Lindsey and I just love all that she stands for and represents! I can’t wait to see how Heather brings God’s word to life through these pages. I just admire how down to earth and real she is through her writing. It’s cathartic to read!
The Pressure Trap: Breaking Free from the Pressures of Society to Become Who God Called You to be

Overlooked : Does Anyone See Me and What I’m Going Through?: Cornelius Lindsey

Overlooked: Does Anyone See Me and What I'm Going Through?Have you ever felt overlooked by God? Have you felt like you’re always the bridesmaid or the groomsman but never the bride or groom? Have you felt like you’re always the last to be considered—like you’re forgotten by your friends and family? Are you searching for answers to these questions and so many more? If so, this book is for you. Cornelius takes you on a journey of self-discovery and enlightenment. He challenges you to think differently about what it means to be overlooked. Writing about his own experiences and sharing stories from people he’s encountered while traveling the world, he explores the feelings everyday people have about significance, self-worth and finding their place in the world. Take this journey of self-discovery and answer the question: Does anyone see me and  what I’m going through?

I’m also currently reading this book and already I’m captivated! This is the first book I’m reading by Cornelius Lindsey ( husband to Heather Lindsey)  and I’m already looking into picking up a few more.:)

End Of The Year TBR…

End Of The Year TBR…

Hey guys…

So I had TBR when I first started this blog but somehow as the year went on, I became distracted and really lost interest in reading the remaining books on my list. 😦 As you may know, I have a serious addiction to buying books ( lol) so over the course of the year I have purchased and read many amazing books. So, I decided to be realistic and choose a few books that I would like to complete by the December 31st! Hopefully the books that I was not able to finish from my current TBR will make it on to my list once again and finally get completed!

So here are my choices for my end of year TBR!

The Illegal: By Lawrence Hill ( Author of  “The Book of Negroes”) 

Keita Ali is on the run.

Like every boy on the mountainous island of Zantoroland, running is all Keita’s ever wanted to do. In one of the poorest nations in the world, running means respect. Running means riches-until Keita is targeted for his father’s outspoken political views and discovers he must run for his family’s survival.

He signs on with notorious marathon agent Anton Hamm, but when Keita fails to place among the top finishers in his first race, he escapes into Freedom State-a wealthy island nation that has elected a government bent on deporting the refugees living within its borders in the community of AfricTown. Keita can stay safe only if he keeps moving and eludes Hamm and the officials who would deport him to his own country, where he would face almost certain death.

This is the new underground: a place where tens of thousands of people deemed to be “illegal” live below the radar of the police and government officials. As Keita surfaces from time to time to earn cash prizes by running local road races, he has to assess whether the people he meets are friends or enemies: John Falconer, a gifted student struggling to escape the limits of his AfricTown upbringing; Ivernia Beech, a spirited old woman at risk of being forced into an assisted living facility; Rocco Calder, a recreational marathoner and the immigration minister; Lula DiStefano, self-declared queen of AfricTown and madam of the community’s infamous brothel; and Viola Hill, a reporter who is investigating the lengths to which her government will go to stop illegal immigration.

Keita’s very existence in Freedom State is illegal. As he trains in secret, eluding capture, the stakes keep getting higher. Soon, he is running not only for his life, but for his sister’s life, too. 

I’m looking forward to reading this book. I was a huge fan of “The Book of Negroes”.  I’m especially proud to support this author as he is Canadian and lives right in my hometown! His other book “Any Known Blood” was on my TBR,but sadly I didn’t get to it.

The Tears of Dark Water: By Corban Addison

Daniel and Vanessa Parker are an American success story. He is a Washington, DC, power broker, and she is a physician with a thriving practice. But behind the gilded facade, their marriage is a shambles, and their teenage son, Quentin, is self-destructing. In desperation, Daniel dusts off a long-delayed dream a sailing trip around the world. Little does he know, the voyage he hopes will save them may destroy them instead.

Half a world away on the lawless coast of Somalia, Ismail Adan Ibrahim is living a life of crime in violation of everything he was raised to believe except for the love and loyalty driving him to hijack ships for ransom and plot the rescue of his sister, Yasmin, from the man who murdered their father. There is nothing he will not do to save her, even if it means taking innocent lives.

Paul Derrick is the FBI s top hostage negotiator. His twin sister, Megan, is a celebrated defense attorney. They have reached the summit of their careers by savvy, grit, and a secret determination to escape the memory of the day their family died. When Paul is dispatched to handle a hostage crisis at sea, he has no idea how far it will take him and Megan into the past or the chance it will give them to redeem the future.

Across continents and oceans, through storms and civil wars, the paths of these individuals converge in a single, explosive moment. It is a moment that will test them and break them, but it will also leave behind an unexpected glimmer of hope that out of the ashes of tragedy and misfortune, the seeds of justice and reconciliation can grow

Mystery/Thriller is usually not the type of genre I gravitate towards, but this year I read two of this authors books ( “A Walk Across The Sun” and “The Garden of Burning Sand”) and I really enjoyed them! I’m looking forward to reading this.

The Golden Son: By Shilpi Somaya Gowda

Anil is the cherished son of a large family in rural India. As the eldest boy, he is expected to inherit the role of leader of his clan and arbiter of its disputes, dispensing wisdom and good advice. Leena is his closest companion, a fiercely brave girl who loves nothing more than the wild terrain they inhabit and her close-knit family. As childhood friends, they are inseparable—but as adulthood approaches, they grow apart.

Anil is the first person in his family to leave India, the first to attend college, the first to become a doctor. Half a world away in Dallas, Texas, he is caught up in his new life, experiencing all the freedoms and temptations of American culture: he tastes alcohol for the first time, falls in love, and learns firsthand about his adopted country’s alluring, dangerous contradictions. Though his work in a gritty urban hospital is grueling, Anil is determined to carve out his own life in America.

At home, Leena dreams of marriage, a strong and true love like the one shared by her parents, and leaves her beloved home to join her new husband’s family in a distant village.

Then things start to go wrong: Anil makes a medical mistake with tragic results, his first love begins to fray and a devastating event makes him question his worth as a doctor and as a friend. On a visit home, Anil rekindles a friendship with the woman who seems to understand him better than anyone else. But their relationship is complicated by a fateful decision made years earlier.

As the two old friends discover each other again, they must also weigh the choice between responsibility and freedom, and between loyalty and love.

I absolutely loved this authors book “Secret Daughter” when I read it a few years back and so, as I was perusing the shelf at Indigo books ( as usual lol)  I saw ( recognized) the authors name on the shelf and decided to give it a try!

 

Finally,

Half of a Yellow Sun : By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

With effortless grace, celebrated author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie illuminates a seminal moment in modern African history: Biafra’s impassioned struggle to establish an independent republic in southeastern Nigeria during the late 1960s. We experience this tumultuous decade alongside five unforgettable characters: Ugwu, a thirteen-year-old houseboy who works for Odenigbo, a university professor full of revolutionary zeal; Olanna, the professor’s beautiful young mistress who has abandoned her life in Lagos for a dusty town and her lover’s charm; and Richard, a shy young Englishman infatuated with Olanna’s willful twin sister Kainene. Half of a Yellow Sun is a tremendously evocative novel of the promise, hope, and disappointment of the Biafran war.

This book was actually on my previous TBR so I’m looking forward to actually reading it! I read “Purple Hibiscus” by this author not too long ago and it was an okay read. I did really enjoy the book “Americanah” by this author as well.

So that’s it folks! I’m hoping I can actually finish these books with the holidays coming up! But… currently the show “Nashville” has been RUNNING my LIFE sooo…. I’m obsessed ( lol)

 

What are you guys reading for the rest of the year?

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: 5 Books YouTube Made Me Read….

Wednesday Weekly  Reads: 5 Books YouTube Made Me Read….

Hey Guys,

I haven’t done a Wednesday Weekly Reads in quite some time because quite frankly, I haven’t been enjoying the books that I have chosen recently : (  I do promise to do an updated What I’m Currently Reading post and an Updated TBR list  to see what progress( or lack thereof lol) I made on my previous TBR.

But lets segue from that and dive into a fun topic! Books YouTube “made” me read . There are quite a few of them! I’d like to share a few of them with you and my brief opinion on them.

  1. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green: I really enjoyed this book. This was my first John Green book and I must say I was pleasantly surprised. I really wanted to read this book because I wanted to see the movie ( I have this weird thing about reading the book before watching the movie :P) So I purchased it. Seeing as it is categorized as  Young Adult Fiction, it was very inexpensive.( 10.99 CND) I had never heard about this book until I saw it on YouTube and everyone was raving about it! I’d recommend it for anyone looking for a good cry!                                                                                                     Synopsis: Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.
  2. Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng. I was so amped to read this book and was severely let down.  I did not enjoy this  book at all. I actually purchased this book… I wish I would have borrowed this one from the library. I honestly only finished this because I paid for it lol . Maybe this is a great literary piece of fiction and its allegories are above me… but yeah it’s not something i would ever recommend.                                     Synopsis: Lydia is dead. But they don’t know this yet . . . So begins this debut novel about a mixed-race family living in 1970s Ohio and the tragedy that will either be their undoing or their salvation. Lydia is the favorite child of Marilyn and James Lee; their middle daughter, a girl who inherited her mother’s bright blue eyes and her father’s jet-black hair. Her parents are determined that Lydia will fulfill the dreams they were unable to pursue—in Marilyn’s case that her daughter become a doctor rather than a homemaker, in James’s case that Lydia be popular at school, a girl with a busy social life and the center of every party.

    When Lydia’s body is found in the local lake, the delicate balancing act that has been keeping the Lee family together tumbles into chaos, forcing them to confront the long-kept secrets that have been slowly pulling them apart.

  3. Americanah by Chimimanda Ngozi Adichie: LOVED this book. I purchased an e-book copy of this book off of Itunes. I actually would like to purchase a hard copy of this book for my collection. I would recommend this book for everyone to read! This was the first book I read by this author. I have recently read “Purple Hibiscus” by her and have ” Half of  A Yelllow Sun” on my TBR ( i actually started this book a long time ago but got sidetracked and put it down)                                                                            Synopsis: As teenagers in a Lagos secondary school, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are leaving the country if they can. Ifemelu—beautiful, self-assured—departs for America to study. She suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships and friendships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race. Obinze—the quiet, thoughtful son of a professor—had hoped to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

    Years later, Obinze is a wealthy man in a newly democratic Nigeria, while Ifemelu has achieved success as a writer of an eye-opening blog about race in America. But when Ifemelu returns to Nigeria, and she and Obinze reignite their shared passion—for their homeland and for each other—they will face the toughest decisions of their lives.

  4. Mosquitoland by David Arnold: Wow what a strangely intoxicating and captivating read! I read this book because I saw it on the channel of a girl whose book choices are pretty similar to mine ( Peruse Project) Good choice! I think I read this book in a day and a bit. I wasn’t completely sold on how it ended but all in all, it was a good read.   Synopsis:After the sudden collapse of her family, Mim Malone is dragged from her home in northern Ohio to the “wastelands” of Mississippi, where she lives in a medicated milieu with her dad and new stepmom. Before the dust has a chance to settle, she learns her mother is sick back in Cleveland.

    So she ditches her new life and hops aboard a northbound Greyhound bus to her real home and her real mother, meeting a quirky cast of fellow travelers along the way. But when her thousand-mile journey takes a few turns she could never see coming, Mim must confront her own demons, redefining her notions of love, loyalty, and what it means to be sane.

  5. Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard. I literally went on the waitlist at the library for MONTHS for this book because everyone and their mother was raving about it on YouTube, I’m not into fantasy fiction at all, but I do enjoy a good dystopian plot which this book had elements of. But guys, 25 pages in and I was OVER IT. I just simply couldn’t finish it. You may like it though, Everyone had great things to say about it 🙂     Synopsis:The Reds are commoners, ruled by a Silver elite in possession of god-like superpowers. And to Mare Barrow, a seventeen-year-old Red girl from the poverty-stricken Stilts, it seems like nothing will ever change.

    That is, until she finds herself working in the Silver Palace. Here, surrounded by the people she hates the most, Mare discovers that, despite her red blood, she possesses a deadly power of her own. One that threatens to destroy the balance of power.

    Fearful of Mare’s potential, the Silvers hide her in plain view, declaring her a long-lost Silver princess, now engaged to a Silver prince. Despite knowing that one misstep would mean her death, Mare works silently to help the Red Guard, a militant resistance group, and bring down the Silver regime.

    But this is a world of betrayal and lies, and Mare has entered a dangerous dance – Reds against Silvers, prince against prince, and Mare against her own heart..Maybe you’ll find a book on this list that strikes your fancy! Happy Reading!  xoxo . ( All synopsis were found on Goodreads.com)

What I Read This Week… August 24-29 2015

What I Read This Week… August 24-29 2015

Hey guys!

Yes I know it’s not Wednesday, but honestly I didn’t have much to write about this week in regards to reading  ( lol) shocker! I actually read quite a bit, but I didn’t  complete one book, I was kinda of jumping around between 3 different books: Judah Smith’s  Life Is : God’s illogical love will change your existence“,  Harper Lee’s ” Go Set a Watchman”  and book called “Sacred Ground” by Adrienne Ellis Reeves, The synopsis of this book is as follows: 

Makima Gray has prayed for guidance in building her town’s new medical clinic, and she’s sure that Gabriel Bell’s property is the perfect location. Gabe insists he’s not at liberty to sell, but Makima won’t give up…nor can she deny that she’s flattered by Gabe’s attentions. But past hurts and present complications lead to an error in judgment that may drive Gabe away forever.

Gabriel Bell was astonished to inherit his great-grandfather’s land, along with clues to a mysterious treasure. But every second he spends with beautiful, determined Makima convinces him that winning her trust—and her heart—is the most important quest of all.

This book was another random pick off of my shelf. Its been sitting there since about 2007 ( no I’m not kidding lol) and I’m really trying to cut down my unread books on my shelf before buying any more books 🙂  So far so good.

I’m really enjoying Judah Smiths book. Such deep content but such an entertaining read. I can’t say the same about ” Go Set A Watchman” . It’s a really slow read but I’m really trying to finish it.

So that’s it guys! I really will be back on my game this Wednesday! 🙂

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Back on The Reading Train…

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Back on The Reading Train…

Hey guys!

I skipped a week of Wednesday Weekly Reads because frankly, I read nothing (lol), As summer is winding down, I’m slowly getting back into the reading groove. I was able to read 2 books in their entirety and about 100 pages of another.

So lets begin. I know I have been choosing books with heavy content so I wanted to read something light and fun, So I chose a book called ” A Lova Like No Otha”  by Stephanie Perry Moore ( I know, I know cheesy title 😛 ) This is a book that has been sitting on my bookshelf for years. I’m slowly trying to read all the unread books on my shelf ( there are far too many) So i picked this one up. I would describe this book as an urban romance novel. The synopsis of this book is as follows:

Surviving life’s setbacks through her relationship with a man who helps restore her faith in God, Zoe Clark discovers A LOVA’ LIKE NO OTHA’. When thunder and lightning strike on the morning of Zoe Clark’s wedding, her seemingly perfect world is turned upside-down as she loses her fiance to a pregnant girlfriend she never knew he had. With her engagement shattered, all her life’s plans seem over. Unemployed, sinking deeply into depression, and wrongly blaming God for her troubles, Zoe seriously contemplates ending her life. But God sends Chase Farr to reintroduce Zoe to the importance of having God in her life. Yet when Zoe’s friendship with Chase turns romantic, he suddenly backs away–further confusing Zoe with his decision to remain a virgin. Through life’s twists and turns of celebration and sorrow, Zoe ultimately learns what it means to truly trust in God–but in the end, does this revelation come too late to fix things with Chase? ( goodreads.com)

This book was gifted to me, so I had no idea what the synopsis was. I was pleasantly surprised that it had a strong spiritual connotation, I really enjoyed this book. I mean some parts were really predictable.  but It was really well written! I wouldn’t be opposed to reading more items from this author. If you are looking for a quick, light read this is the book for you! I give it 4 out of 5 stars.

4./5 stars..

Next, I grabbed another book from my unread book shelf.  It was entitled ” That Girl is Poison” by Tia Hines. This book is a book I picked up in Fordham Square in the Bronx for 5 dollars! ( shout out to my bestie for putting me on!) It sounded interesting. Here is the synopsis:

Desire Jones is a young, hot-to-trot teen who lives life on the edge. Abandoned by her mother, she yearns for love and attention. Her uncle shelters her, but life is impossible to bear with his abusive wife. To make things worse, she gets involved with Malik, who shatters her hope and trust by leaving her pregnant and infected with HIV. So hardened, she decides to do the unspeakable, purposely infecting people with her disease. Of course, no one knows of her intent, not even her best friend, Jennifer, who unwittingly helps Desire find her victims. Will Desire realize the error of her ways before it’s too late?

Y’all…. don;t read this book for the following reasons.:
– The story was all over the place
–  So many bad things happened in what seemed to be such a short period of time
– Couldn’t connect with the characters
– Extremely explicit content ( not suitable for anybody under 17 in my opinion and a mature 17 at that…)

Guys, this was probably the worst book I’ve read all year. Story was so unbelievable. Jumped all over the place… I read it quickly just to get it over with. Ending sucked . Leaves the possibility for a sequel that I will not be reading … Not that I’m discrediting the situation that the author was portraying. I’m not naive to the fact that young women experience hardships like this everyday, however I feel like she was doing too much to one character. If she had maybe chose one or two situations to focus on, I think the book would have been more effective, Sadly, I must give this book 1 star out of 5.

I don’t recommend this book… 1 star out 5

Lastly, I continued reading ” Go Set a Watchman”  ( To Kill a Mockingbird sequel). I’m just over a 100 pages in. It’s…… meh…. I’m going to finish this book before I give any opinions on it.

So this week, I want to finish that book and maybe try to finally tackle the bookLife Is _____.: God’s Illogical Love Will Change Your Existence” by Judah Smith. It’s a book I purchased months ago that I really want to tackle.  I spoke about it in previous blogs. The synopsis once again is as follows:

Life is ___. How would you finish that sentence? In this follow-up to his New York Times and USA Today bestseller Jesus Is _____., Judah completes the new sentence again and again, revealing how life is to be loved and to love, to enjoy God to the fullest, to trust God in every moment, and to be at peace with God, others, and ourselves. Judah writes as a friend, welcoming new believers, lifelong followers of Jesus, and even the merely curious.

Judah shows us the irrational love of God and the life that he intends for us to have in the here and now. With excitement and humor, he looks at the stories in the Bible from a different angle and shows how life is all about loving God and loving others.

I absolutely loved Jesus Is and look forward to tackling this one. I’m going on a mini road trip today, So I’ll have about 2 hours to take this on! Excited! I also want to continue this trend of picking something off my bookshelf and tackling that as well!

Hope you all have a successful reading week!

xoxo