May Reads…

May Reads…

Hey guys!

I’ve been grappling with what I want to read this month as it appears that there is barely any free time at my grasp this month! Your girl is booked and busy! Work and weddings, bridal showers and other celebrations leaves little to no time for leisurely afternoons curled up with a good book, which is why I’ve chosen only 2 books and a couple months of Essence and Ebony magazines to focus on. Here’s what I chose…

  1. An American Marriage: By Tayari Jones

    Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive, and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime Celestial knows he didn’t commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend, and best man at their wedding. As Roy’s time in prison passes, she is unable to hold on to the love that has been her center. After five years, Roy’s conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together
    An American Marriage
  2. Life Is _____.: God’s Illogical Love Will Change Your Existence – By: Judah Smith

    Life is ____.  How would you finish that sentence?
    Judah Smith believes Jesus shows us how to live life to the fullest. In this follow-up to his New York Times and USA Today bestseller Jesus Is ____, Judah completes the new sentence again and again, revealing how·      Life is to be loved and to love.
  3. ·      Life is to trust God in every moment.
  4. ·      Life is to be at peace with God and yourself.
  5. ·      Life is to enjoy God.
  6. Judah writes as a friend, welcoming new believers, lifelong followers of Jesus, and even the merely curious. He shows us the love of God that defies human logic and the life that God intends for us to have in the here and now. With excitement and humor, Judah looks at the stories in the Bible from his unique angle and shows how life is all about loving God and loving others
    Life Is _____.: God's Illogical Love Will Change Your Existence

That’s all I’m reading this month y’all! What are you reading this month? I need some suggestions for June!

xoxo
©justlovethemanyway
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April Reads…

April Reads…

Hey y’all

I only have a few books on my radar for this month. Check them out down below! 🙂

  1. The Mother of Black Hollywood: A Memoir: Jenifer Lewis 
    Jenifer Lewis keeps it real in this provocative and touching memoir by a mid-western girl with a dream whose journey from poverty to Hollywood will move, shock, and inspire readers.

    Told in the audacious voice her fans adore, Jenifer describes a road to fame made treacherous by dysfunction and undiagnosed mental illness, including a sex addiction. Yet, supported by loving friends and strengthened by “inner soldiers,” Jenifer never stopped entertaining and creating.

    We watch as Jenifer develops icon status stemming from a series of legendary screen roles as the sassy, yet loveable, mama or auntie. And we watch as her emotional disturbances, culminating in a breakdown while filming The Temptationsmovie, launch her on a continuing search for answers, love, and healing.

    Written with no-holds-barred honesty and illustrated with sixteen-pages of color photos, this gripping memoir is filled with insights gained through a unique life that offers a universal message: “Love yourself so that love will not be a stranger when it comes.”

    From her first taste of applause at five years old to landing on Broadway within eleven days of graduation and ultimately achieving success in movies, television and global concert halls, Jenifer reveals her outrageous life story with lots of humor, a few regrets and most importantly, unbridled joy. Candid, warm and wonderfully inspiring, The Mother of Black Hollywood intimately reveals the heart of a woman who lives life to the fullest (Goodreads.com)
    The Mother of Black Hollywood: A Memoir

  2. Sin of a Woman: Kimberla Lawson-Roby
    ( This is book 14 ( yes 14 lol) in the Reverend Curtis Black series. This series has kept me captivated for years. Each time I think this author can’t take the series any further, she finds a way to keep the characters vivacious and full of life! I would suggest reading this series from the start, but this book can be read as a stand alone novel )
    ****************************

    Raven Black is bouncing back after her very public divorce from Dillon. He’s done everything he can to discredit her, but she’s learned from her mistakes and him. In fact, she’s become her ex-husband in more ways than one and is slowly but surely leading those connected to her down a terrible path of destruction. Playing with the lives of innocent people has dire consequences, the kind that Raven won’t see coming. ( Goodreads.com)
    Sin of a Woman

  3. Ghana Must Go: Taiye Selasi 
    Kweku Sai is dead. A renowned surgeon and failed husband, he succumbs suddenly at dawn outside his home in suburban Accra. The news of Kweku’s death sends a ripple around the world, bringing together the family he abandoned years before. Ghana Must Go is their story. Electric, exhilarating, beautifully crafted, Ghana Must Go is a testament to the transformative power of unconditional love, from a debut novelist of extraordinary talent.

    Moving with great elegance through time and place, Ghana Must Go charts the Sais’ circuitous journey to one another. In the wake of Kweku’s death, his children gather in Ghana at their enigmatic mother’s new home. The eldest son and his wife; the mysterious, beautiful twins; the baby sister, now a young woman: each carries secrets of his own. What is revealed in their coming together is the story of how they came apart: the hearts broken, the lies told, the crimes committed in the name of love. Splintered, alone, each navigates his pain, believing that what has been lost can never be recovered—until, in Ghana, a new way forward, a new family, begins to emerge.

    Ghana Must Go is at once a portrait of a modern family, and an exploration of the importance of where we come from to who we are. In a sweeping narrative that takes us from Accra to Lagos to London to New York, Ghana Must Go teaches that the truths we speak can heal the wounds we hide. ( Goodreads.com) 
    Ghana Must Go: A Novel

  4. Daughters of Grace Devotional : Created by the Daily Grace Co. 
    The Daughters of Grace study is a study of the women of the Bible and the God of grace. The 8.5×11 full color book covers 28 women of the Bible. The book includes study questions and is perfect for group or individual study. I’m going you use this to do some in depth study of some the Bible’s most exciting characters. This company has so many aesthetically beautiful and well written devotionals on many different books and themes. Check them out!

    Daughters of Grace - Study of the Women of the BibleThat’s it for this month! I’m halfway through my first book and looking forward to a  month full of enjoyable reading! Till next time!
    xoxo
    ©justlovethemanyway
    ( This post is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. All synopsis’ are courtesy of thedailygraceco.com and Goodreads.com)

My Autumn Reading List 2017…

My Autumn Reading List 2017…

Hey guys!

The weather is getting much cooler, which means its just about time for me to go into hibernation mode!! ( I live in Canada and winter is not a friend of mine, so I’ll be inside LOL) One of the things I love to do( especially when I’m trying to avoid going outside) is read.. like actually books! ( Do people still do that? Lol) Here are the books I’m going to try and get through this season!

(All Synopsis are copyright of Goodreads.com)

Salvage the Bones : By Jesmyn Ward

Winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Fiction A hurricane is building over the Gulf of Mexico, threatening the coastal town of Bois Sauvage, Mississippi, and Esch’s father is growing concerned. A hard drinker, largely absent, he doesn’t show concern for much else. Esch and her three brothers are stocking food, but there isn’t much to save. Lately, Esch can’t keep down what food she gets; she’s fourteen and pregnant. Her brother Skeetah is sneaking scraps for his prized pitbull’s new litter, dying one by one in the dirt. While brothers Randall and Junior try to stake their claim in a family long on child’s play and short on parenting. As the twelve days that comprise the novel’s framework yield to the final day and Hurricane Katrina, the unforgettable family at the novel’s heart–motherless children sacrificing for each other as they can, protecting and nurturing where love is scarce–pulls itself up to struggle for another day. A wrenching look at the lonesome, brutal, and restrictive realities of rural poverty, “Salvage the Bone” is muscled with poetry, revelatory, and real. ©Goodreads

Salvage the Bones

 

Sing Unburied Sing:  By Jesmyn Ward

A searing and profound Southern odyssey by National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward.

In Jesmyn Ward’s first novel since her National Book Award winning Salvage the Bones, this singular American writer brings the archetypal road novel into rural twenty-first-century America. Drawing on Morrison and Faulkner, The Odyssey and the Old Testament, Ward gives us an epochal story, a journey through Mississippi’s past and present that is both an intimate portrait of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle. Ward is a major American writer, multiply awarded and universally lauded, and in Sing, Unburied, Sing she is at the height of her powers.

Jojo and his toddler sister, Kayla, live with their grandparents, Mam and Pop, and the occasional presence of their drug-addicted mother, Leonie, on a farm on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. Leonie is simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high; Mam is dying of cancer; and quiet, steady Pop tries to run the household and teach Jojo how to be a man. When the white father of Leonie’s children is released from prison, she packs her kids and a friend into her car and sets out across the state for Parchman farm, the Mississippi State Penitentiary, on a journey rife with danger and promise.

Sing, Unburied, Sing grapples with the ugly truths at the heart of the American story and the power, and limitations, of the bonds of family. Rich with Ward’s distinctive, musical language, Sing, Unburied, Sing is a majestic new work and an essential contribution to American literature. ©Goodreads

32920226

 

Behold, The Dreamers: By Imbolo Mbue

Jende Jonga, a Cameroonian immigrant living in Harlem, has come to the United States to provide a better life for himself, his wife, Neni, and their six-year-old son. In the fall of 2007, Jende can hardly believe his luck when he lands a job as a chauffeur for Clark Edwards, a senior executive at Lehman Brothers. Clark demands punctuality, discretion, and loyalty—and Jende is eager to please. Clark’s wife, Cindy, even offers Neni temporary work at the Edwardses’ summer home in the Hamptons. With these opportunities, Jende and Neni can at last gain a foothold in America and imagine a brighter future.

However, the world of great power and privilege conceals troubling secrets, and soon Jende and Neni notice cracks in their employers’ façades.

When the financial world is rocked by the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the Jongas are desperate to keep Jende’s job—even as their marriage threatens to fall apart. As all four lives are dramatically upended, Jende and Neni are forced to make an impossible choice.

Behold the Dreamers

New People: By Danzy Senna

From the bestselling author of Caucasia, a subversive and engrossing novel of race, class and manners in contemporary America.

As the twentieth century draws to a close, Maria is at the start of a life she never thought possible. She and Khalil, her college sweetheart, are planning their wedding. They are the perfect couple, “King and Queen of the Racially Nebulous Prom.” Their skin is the same shade of beige. They live together in a black bohemian enclave in Brooklyn, where Khalil is riding the wave of the first dot-com boom and Maria is plugging away at her dissertation, on the Jonestown massacre. They’ve even landed a starring role in a documentary about “new people” like them, who are blurring the old boundaries as a brave new era dawns. Everything Maria knows she should want lies before her–yet she can’t stop daydreaming about another man, a poet she barely knows. As fantasy escalates to fixation, it dredges up secrets from the past and threatens to unravel not only Maria’s perfect new life but her very persona.

Heartbreaking and darkly comic, New People is a bold and unfettered page-turner that challenges our every assumption about how we define one another, and ourselves ©Goodreads

New People

A Kind of Freedom:  By Margaret Wilkerson Sexton

Evelyn is a Creole woman who comes of age in New Orleans at the height of World War Two. Her family inhabits the upper echelon of Black society and when she falls for no-name Renard, she is forced to choose between her life of privilege and the man she loves.

In 1982, Evelyn’s daughter, Jackie, is a frazzled single mother grappling with her absent husband’s drug addiction. Just as she comes to terms with his abandoning the family, he returns, ready to resume their old life. Jackie must decide if the promise of her husband is worth the near certainty he’ll leave again.

Jackie’s son, T.C., loves the creative process of growing marijuana more than the weed itself. He finds something hypnotic about training the seedlings, testing the levels, trimming the leaves, drying the buds. He was a square before Hurricane Katrina, but the New Orleans he knew didn’t survive the storm, and in its wake he was changed too. Now, fresh out of a four-month stint for possession with the intent to distribute, he decides to start over—until an old friend convinces him to stake his new beginning on one last deal.

For Evelyn, Jim Crow is an ongoing reality, and in its wake new threats spring up to haunt her descendants. A Kind of Freedom is an urgent novel that explores the legacy of racial disparity in the South through a poignant and redemptive family history ©Goodreads

A Kind of Freedom

The final book on this list is one I can brag about because it was written by my very own cousin Michelle Collins. I’m excited to dive in and will provide you with a full review as soon as I finish! (This synopsis is courtesy of Amazon.com)

Spirit Check By: Michelle Collins

“If you’re ever going to master your emotions, the first order of business is to get out of your feelings.” From the book “Spirit Check” Your attitude, behavior and mindset define your spirit, which is the seat of your emotions. Through the lens of self examination, five bold and common emotions + character flaws are exposed that derail personal, spiritual success and growth. In Spirit Check, Michelle Collins provides a persuasive commentary on the five [jealousy, intimidation, fear pride and anger], with practical solutions for immediate implementation to transform the mind, soul and spirit. Discover how biblical principles and practical solutions can aid in your goal to become whole and spiritually healthy. Commit to a healthier more excellent way of mastering your emotions, masterfully .©Amazon

That’s the end of my list, my very ambitious list mind you seeing as I am taking 2 classes, working full time, blogging , on top of ministry obligations lol! Lunch hour reading it is!  Wish me luck!

What are you guys reading this autumn?
xoxo
©justlovethemanyway

 

 

End Of The Year TBR…

End Of The Year TBR…

Hey guys…

So I had TBR when I first started this blog but somehow as the year went on, I became distracted and really lost interest in reading the remaining books on my list. 😦 As you may know, I have a serious addiction to buying books ( lol) so over the course of the year I have purchased and read many amazing books. So, I decided to be realistic and choose a few books that I would like to complete by the December 31st! Hopefully the books that I was not able to finish from my current TBR will make it on to my list once again and finally get completed!

So here are my choices for my end of year TBR!

The Illegal: By Lawrence Hill ( Author of  “The Book of Negroes”) 

Keita Ali is on the run.

Like every boy on the mountainous island of Zantoroland, running is all Keita’s ever wanted to do. In one of the poorest nations in the world, running means respect. Running means riches-until Keita is targeted for his father’s outspoken political views and discovers he must run for his family’s survival.

He signs on with notorious marathon agent Anton Hamm, but when Keita fails to place among the top finishers in his first race, he escapes into Freedom State-a wealthy island nation that has elected a government bent on deporting the refugees living within its borders in the community of AfricTown. Keita can stay safe only if he keeps moving and eludes Hamm and the officials who would deport him to his own country, where he would face almost certain death.

This is the new underground: a place where tens of thousands of people deemed to be “illegal” live below the radar of the police and government officials. As Keita surfaces from time to time to earn cash prizes by running local road races, he has to assess whether the people he meets are friends or enemies: John Falconer, a gifted student struggling to escape the limits of his AfricTown upbringing; Ivernia Beech, a spirited old woman at risk of being forced into an assisted living facility; Rocco Calder, a recreational marathoner and the immigration minister; Lula DiStefano, self-declared queen of AfricTown and madam of the community’s infamous brothel; and Viola Hill, a reporter who is investigating the lengths to which her government will go to stop illegal immigration.

Keita’s very existence in Freedom State is illegal. As he trains in secret, eluding capture, the stakes keep getting higher. Soon, he is running not only for his life, but for his sister’s life, too. 

I’m looking forward to reading this book. I was a huge fan of “The Book of Negroes”.  I’m especially proud to support this author as he is Canadian and lives right in my hometown! His other book “Any Known Blood” was on my TBR,but sadly I didn’t get to it.

The Tears of Dark Water: By Corban Addison

Daniel and Vanessa Parker are an American success story. He is a Washington, DC, power broker, and she is a physician with a thriving practice. But behind the gilded facade, their marriage is a shambles, and their teenage son, Quentin, is self-destructing. In desperation, Daniel dusts off a long-delayed dream a sailing trip around the world. Little does he know, the voyage he hopes will save them may destroy them instead.

Half a world away on the lawless coast of Somalia, Ismail Adan Ibrahim is living a life of crime in violation of everything he was raised to believe except for the love and loyalty driving him to hijack ships for ransom and plot the rescue of his sister, Yasmin, from the man who murdered their father. There is nothing he will not do to save her, even if it means taking innocent lives.

Paul Derrick is the FBI s top hostage negotiator. His twin sister, Megan, is a celebrated defense attorney. They have reached the summit of their careers by savvy, grit, and a secret determination to escape the memory of the day their family died. When Paul is dispatched to handle a hostage crisis at sea, he has no idea how far it will take him and Megan into the past or the chance it will give them to redeem the future.

Across continents and oceans, through storms and civil wars, the paths of these individuals converge in a single, explosive moment. It is a moment that will test them and break them, but it will also leave behind an unexpected glimmer of hope that out of the ashes of tragedy and misfortune, the seeds of justice and reconciliation can grow

Mystery/Thriller is usually not the type of genre I gravitate towards, but this year I read two of this authors books ( “A Walk Across The Sun” and “The Garden of Burning Sand”) and I really enjoyed them! I’m looking forward to reading this.

The Golden Son: By Shilpi Somaya Gowda

Anil is the cherished son of a large family in rural India. As the eldest boy, he is expected to inherit the role of leader of his clan and arbiter of its disputes, dispensing wisdom and good advice. Leena is his closest companion, a fiercely brave girl who loves nothing more than the wild terrain they inhabit and her close-knit family. As childhood friends, they are inseparable—but as adulthood approaches, they grow apart.

Anil is the first person in his family to leave India, the first to attend college, the first to become a doctor. Half a world away in Dallas, Texas, he is caught up in his new life, experiencing all the freedoms and temptations of American culture: he tastes alcohol for the first time, falls in love, and learns firsthand about his adopted country’s alluring, dangerous contradictions. Though his work in a gritty urban hospital is grueling, Anil is determined to carve out his own life in America.

At home, Leena dreams of marriage, a strong and true love like the one shared by her parents, and leaves her beloved home to join her new husband’s family in a distant village.

Then things start to go wrong: Anil makes a medical mistake with tragic results, his first love begins to fray and a devastating event makes him question his worth as a doctor and as a friend. On a visit home, Anil rekindles a friendship with the woman who seems to understand him better than anyone else. But their relationship is complicated by a fateful decision made years earlier.

As the two old friends discover each other again, they must also weigh the choice between responsibility and freedom, and between loyalty and love.

I absolutely loved this authors book “Secret Daughter” when I read it a few years back and so, as I was perusing the shelf at Indigo books ( as usual lol)  I saw ( recognized) the authors name on the shelf and decided to give it a try!

 

Finally,

Half of a Yellow Sun : By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

With effortless grace, celebrated author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie illuminates a seminal moment in modern African history: Biafra’s impassioned struggle to establish an independent republic in southeastern Nigeria during the late 1960s. We experience this tumultuous decade alongside five unforgettable characters: Ugwu, a thirteen-year-old houseboy who works for Odenigbo, a university professor full of revolutionary zeal; Olanna, the professor’s beautiful young mistress who has abandoned her life in Lagos for a dusty town and her lover’s charm; and Richard, a shy young Englishman infatuated with Olanna’s willful twin sister Kainene. Half of a Yellow Sun is a tremendously evocative novel of the promise, hope, and disappointment of the Biafran war.

This book was actually on my previous TBR so I’m looking forward to actually reading it! I read “Purple Hibiscus” by this author not too long ago and it was an okay read. I did really enjoy the book “Americanah” by this author as well.

So that’s it folks! I’m hoping I can actually finish these books with the holidays coming up! But… currently the show “Nashville” has been RUNNING my LIFE sooo…. I’m obsessed ( lol)

 

What are you guys reading for the rest of the year?

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: I Didn’t Read Much…

Wednesday Weekly Reads: I Didn’t Read Much…

Hey guys!

Quick post today because I visited the eye doctor for an annual check up and she put drops in my eyes to dilate them and my vision is kinda wonky right now! So typing this is a challenge!

Anyway, to make a long story short, i barely did any reading this week and I probably wont do much for the rest of July (lol) Its vacation season and im jetting off on a plane in 2 days. I have yet to pack….. sigh.

I did manage to finish, “All The Bright Places” by Jennifer Niven. What a great book! I really think that the author was able to capture the face of depression and the mask that so many people  wear when trying to convince everyone that they are okay.You can never truly know what someone is going through, but this books serves as a reminder to us all to pay attention.To treat everyone with love and compassion and to cherish those you love each and everyday. One kind word could save a life…I give this book a 4 out of 5 stars.

                     4 out of 5 stars….

As for next week/travel, I have no set goals! I really wanted to re-read ” To Kill a Mockingbird” in anticipation of is sequels ( “Go Set a Watchman) release on July 14th. But the way things are going…who knows?

I am also doing the Proverbs challenge! I chapter of Proverbs a day for the month of July. As of right now its day 8! So far so good. I am also continuing with Ezekiel 🙂

Have a successful reading week!

What are you guys reading this summer?

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Quick Reads

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Quick Reads

Hey Guys!

I hope you had a successful reading week. I did! After completing Roots, I wanted some quick reads that were easier to get through. So I dived back into the world of Young Adult Fiction. 🙂 ( my guilty pleasure)

As I mentioned last week I began the book “Tease” by Amanda Maciel. I managed to finish that really quickly. The content was still pretty deep as the content dealt with bullying/cyber bullying, suicide and the repercussions of your actions. As someone who works with children, It served as a reminder that I need to ensure that the children I am nurturing, are children who are kind, compassionate and wise. If you know of someone being bullied, don’t just let it happen. Speak up and get help. If not, it could cost someone their life. I’d give this book four out of five stars. I’m not sure if I loved the ending of this book. It kind of just ended flatly. All in all, I’d recommend it especially for preteens/teens.

4/5 stars…

Next I picked up the book “Mosquitoland” by David Arnold. The synopsis of this book as found on davidarnoldbooks.com  reads:

After the sudden collapse of her family, Mim Malone is dragged from her home in northern Ohio to the “wastelands” of Mississippi, where she lives in a medicated milieu with her dad and new stepmom. Before the dust has a chance to settle, she learns her mother is sick back in Cleveland.

So she ditches her new life and hops aboard a northbound Greyhound bus to her real home and her real mother, meeting a quirky cast of fellow travelers along the way. But when her thousand-mile journey takes a few turns she could never see coming, Mim must confront her own demons, redefining her notions of love, loyalty, and what it means to be sane.

What a fantastic book! I read this book in a day and a half! This book touches on the serious topics of mental health issues. In this book it becomes evident that the protagonist Mim has some serious issues; mental health and emotional. After being forced to move from Ohio to Mississippi  with her father and stepmother ( leaving her mother behind) Mim is overcome with grief. She decides that she is going to run away and go back home to Ohio and see her mother. For the sake of not spoiling the entire story, Mim meets some interesting characters along the way and in turn discovers some things about herself and her family.  I did find that the last 50 pages or so dragged a bit. I still would encourage people of all ages to read this book. For a debut novel, I am impressed. I look forward to reading more of David Arnold’s work! He has a book in the works right now with a tentative fall 2016 release date. 🙂

4.5 out of 5 stars…

Lastly, I picked up “Watch the Sky” by Kirsten Hubbard. The synopsis of this book is as follows:

The signs are everywhere, Jory’s stepfather, Caleb, says. Red leaves in the springtime. Pages torn from a library book. All the fish in the aquarium facing the same way. A cracked egg with twin yolks. Everywhere and anywhere. And because of them Jory’s life is far from ordinary. He must follow a very specific set of rules: don’t trust anyone outside the family, have your works at the ready just in case, and always, always watch out for the signs. The end is coming, and they must be prepared.

School is Jory’s only escape from Caleb’s tight grasp, and with the help of new friends Jory begins to explore a world beyond his family’s farm. As Jory’s friendships grow, Caleb notifies Jory’s mother and siblings that the time has come for final preparations.

They begin an exhausting schedule digging a mysterious tunnel in anticipation of the disaster. But as the hold gets deeper, so does the family’s doubt about whether Caleb’s prophecy is true. When the stark reality of his stepfather’s plans becomes clear, Jory must choose between living his own life or following Caleb, shutting his eyes to the bright world he’s just begun to see ( goodreads.com)

I have only read about 20 pages of this book so far. So far it’s not really drawing me in. I’m going to really try to finish it! But if I get bored, I will probably pick up one of the other library Young Adult Fiction I have kicking around my house!

I also feel led to deviate from my weekly devotional and spend time in the book of Ezekiel. So I think that’s what I’m going to do this week!! ( Ezekiel 37 is probably my favorite passage of scripture)

Have a wonderful reading week!

What are you reading right now?

xoxo

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Continuing Roots…. and adding a new read

Wednesday Weekly Reads: Continuing Roots…. and adding a new read

Hey ya’ll!

So continued on with my reading of the classic novel “Roots”. Sadly, being the busy week that it was, I didn’t make much headway. I did manage to read 50 pages or so, bringing me to page 553 of 888.  I have reached the point where Kizzy, ( Kunta Kinte’s daughter ) has grown up and fallen in love with Noah ( another slave boy) Kizzy being able to read and write, helps Noah run away by forging a travelling pass for him. He in turn is caught and rats on Kizzy. Her master, despite the pleas of her parents Bell and Kunta, sells her, inevitably splitting up the only family Kunta has had since coming to America. That’s the part of the story I am at right now. It was pretty hard to read this section and I know the rest of the book will be equally as challenging on my heart.

I deviated from my plan to read only Roots until I finished it because I saw a BookTube vlog on a book that sounded so compelling, that I just had to get my hands on it! The book is called, “Tease” by Amanda Maciel.

The synopsis of this book is as follows:( as found on goodreads.com)

From debut author Amanda Maciel comes a provocative and unforgettable novel, inspired by real-life incidents, about a teenage girl who faces criminal charges for bullying after a classmate commits suicide.

Emma Putnam is dead, and it’s all Sara Wharton’s fault. At least, that’s what everyone seems to think. Sara, along with her best friend and three other classmates, has been criminally charged for the bullying and harassment that led to Emma’s shocking suicide. Now Sara is the one who’s ostracized, already guilty according to her peers, the community, and the media. In the summer before her senior year, in between meetings with lawyers and a court-recommended therapist, Sara is forced to reflect on the events that brought her to this moment—and ultimately consider her own role in an undeniable tragedy. And she’ll have to find a way to move forward, even when it feels like her own life is over.

With its powerful narrative, unconventional point of view, and strong anti-bullying theme, this coming-of-age story offers smart, insightful, and nuanced views on high school society, toxic friendships, and family relationships.

This is a story that is very relatable. As an educator, I see the effects of bullying almost on a daily basis. I do believe this will be an interesting read based on the fact that it shows the criminal aspect and also from the perspective of the bully. does she feel remorse? Is she even the main bully? I’ll have to read and find out. I’m already 40 pages in ( i started today) and I can already see that this bully might not be the only factor in this shocking story.

That’s it for this week! Hopefully I can finish up tease and at least 100 more pages of Roots! Wish me luck!

xoxo